Avoiding camera shake with circa 1935 Voigtländer Bessa

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loccdor

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There was a roll of partially exposed Kodak Verichrome Pan film in this camera. I developed it and here is the best out of three images:

That's precious! Great find! I have the feeling the camera was set on a table or chair for that. If it's on a steady object in portrait mode, and you use one hand to gently press down on the body to give it some weight for when you trigger the shutter, it shouldn't get shake.

To me that sounds impossible.

I did my best to brace against the railing, it was not enough. But the scene was of a beautiful remote Greek village at sunset, so I had to try.
 

loccdor

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Thank you for the tip.

This was taken at 1/25, with left elbow braced against a stone wall, camera firmly (but not too firmly) pressed up against face, ring finger trigger - I can see what might be just the tiniest bit of shake if I zoom very far in, but it could be printed pretty big. I do tend to take 2-3 similar shots when speeds are so slow as insurance, if the shot is important to me. I look at how much the edge of the viewfinder is moving against the scene as a guide to how much shake I will get, hold my breath and try to release when I am seeing the least amount of movement. This is the f/4.5 triplet lens at f/11, on a hazy day where the sun has dipped below the hill behind me, on expired (and mottled) HP5+rated at 400.

53158341798_15dc500b2e_k.jpg
 
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Romanko

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Nice image. The light is beautiful. What was the time of the day? You obviously did not have a lot of light if you shot 1/25s, f11 at EI400.
 

loccdor

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Nice image. The light is beautiful. What was the time of the day? You obviously did not have a lot of light if you shot 1/25s, f11 at EI400.

Thank you. Around 8 pm. The sun was low and the mountain behind me was blocking it from reaching the landscape.
 

Eugen Mezei

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Over the years I bought an appreciable quantity of Voigtländer cameras. Some of the folders came with a short release cable. I assumed they got their bent shape from spending decades being bent upward in the closed camera (bellows compressed and bed risen). I guess it was cheaper for Voigtländer to supply the short and bent shape cable (or sell it as an accesory?) than a special order of Deckel/Compur shutters with the socket placed in a better fitting place.
 
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Romanko

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Can you give data about how and with what you developed? I have a thread going on in the darkroom group about developing the decade old latent image.

Kodak Verichrome Pan developed in HC-110 dilution B for 8 minutes 15 seconds at 14 degrees Celsius. The plan was to develop at 18 degrees for 6 minutes as per Kodak data sheet, but the day was hot and I cooled the chemistry too much so ended up adjusting the time using the equation: T = T0 * exp(-0.081(t - t0)); where T0 and t0 are development time and temperature known from the data sheet (6 min and 18 degrees); T is development time at temperature t.

Could you please post a link to your thread?
 
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Romanko

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I guess it was cheaper for Voigtländer to supply the short and bent shape cable

I saw pictures from old Voigtländer catalogues and it looks like the cable was meant to be left in the camera. I doubt that I can do this with my Bessa though. I will need to rotate the shutter first, attach the cable and rotate the shutter back hoping that the cable does not break and remains functional.
 

Eugen Mezei

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I saw pictures from old Voigtländer catalogues and it looks like the cable was meant to be left in the camera. I doubt that I can do this with my Bessa though. I will need to rotate the shutter first, attach the cable and rotate the shutter back hoping that the cable does not break and remains functional.

I unscrewed and screwed back that cable in various Voigtländer folders, including different generations of Bessa.

It is comical how nobody would take out the engine of their car and turn it around when a problem occures but assume in a pinch that Voigtländer employed idiots incapable of mounting the shutter in the right position.

I guarantee you can screw in the cable, it needs a bit of fiddling indeed.
Try to have the struts not completly erected, also try to have the lever pressed/unpressed so it gets out of the way. RTFM would also not be wrong, V. explains what you have to do.

L.E.: Here you go: https://cameramanuals.org/voigtlander_pdf/voigtlander_bessa-optical-finder.pdf Second picture in that manual. You can clearly see how the socket for the cable is fully accessible when the struts are not completly erected. They right strut advances "over" the hole only when locked in place. Until then you can screw in any cable (with the correct thread, it escapes me at the moment how this thread is called) and then either bend it upwards or thread it under/behind the struth before locking them.
This way it even does not need fiddling at all.
 

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Ballinderry-Michael

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I unscrewed and screwed back that cable in various Voigtländer folders, including different generations of Bessa.

It is comical how nobody would take out the engine of their car and turn it around when a problem occures but assume in a pinch that Voigtländer employed idiots incapable of mounting the shutter in the right position.

I guarantee you can screw in the cable, it needs a bit of fiddling indeed.
Try to have the struts not completly erected, also try to have the lever pressed/unpressed so it gets out of the way. RTFM would also not be wrong, V. explains what you have to do.
L.E.: Here you go: https://cameramanuals.org/voigtlander_pdf/voigtlander_bessa-optical-finder.pdf Second picture in that manual. You can clearly see how the socket for the cable is fully accessible when the struts are not completly erected. They right strut advances "over" the hole only when locked in place. Until then you can screw in any cable (with the correct thread, it escapes me at the moment how this thread is called) and then either bend it upwards or thread it under/behind the struth.

You clearly haven't looked at the OP's photos in post no. 8. His cable release fitting is nothing like the one you reference.
 

Eugen Mezei

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Kodak Verichrome Pan developed in HC-110 dilution B for 8 minutes 15 seconds at 14 degrees Celsius. The plan was to develop at 18 degrees for 6 minutes as per Kodak data sheet, but the day was hot and I cooled the chemistry too much so ended up adjusting the time using the equation: T = T0 * exp(-0.081(t - t0)); where T0 and t0 are development time and temperature known from the data sheet (6 min and 18 degrees); T is development time at temperature t.

The picture came out very clear. How old do you think the latent image was when you developed it?
Do you think the developer or the temperature had the biggest influence?

Could you please post a link to your thread?

Yes. https://www.photrio.com/forum/threa...technique-of-the-very-old-latent-image.204456
 

Eugen Mezei

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You clearly haven't looked at the OP's photos in post no. 8. His cable release fitting is nothing like the one you reference.

Ofcourse it is. You just see it in his photos from the side and in the drawing from the front.
With the struts semifolded both the struth as the lever advance backwards, giving acces to the cable release fitting.
Butkus has manuals for other variants of the Bessa 1, the procedure is always the same, be it the short version fitting or the one mounted a bit lower on the shutter and having a longer corpus. The OP just have to keep the strut even more unfolded than what the drawing shows. Important is that strut and shutter activating lever pivot out of the way. In short, the trick to know is, not to mount the cable with the lensboard fully erected.
 
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Besk

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The metal tip of my newer cable release is longer that the metal tip end of some older cable releases.
The shorter tip end allows the cable release to fit in tighter places.
 
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Romanko

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I guarantee you can screw in the cable, it needs a bit of fiddling indeed.
I sacrificed a half-broken cable release to clarify the matter.
Attaching the cable to a partially folded camera was indeed straightforward. To fully erect the camera I had to bend the cable at a very sharp angle resulting in breakage of thereof (or it would have it was not already broken). The cable was not functional when attached to the shutter which is hardly surprising.

cable-release-01.jpg
cable-release-02.jpg
cable-release-03.jpg
 
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Old books about photography often suggested to use two parts of the hand as pliers, in order to avoid shakes while the shutter is triggered. The most frequent suggestion was to use thumb and index in opposition.

This may sound obvious to some degree, but the only way to truly understand how effective it is in balancing the forces applied to the camera and avoid shaking/tilting is to try it out yourself. Simple but tremendously effective.

I use this trick all of the times with 6x9 Super Ikontas, which have a pretty stiff shutter release button, which also happens to be placed on the left side of the camera body (contrary to today standards).
 

Eugen Mezei

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I sacrificed a half-broken cable release to clarify the matter.
Attaching the cable to a partially folded camera was indeed straightforward. To fully erect the camera I had to bend the cable at a very sharp angle resulting in breakage of thereof (or it would have it was not already broken). The cable was not functional when attached to the shutter which is hardly surprising.

View attachment 362952
View attachment 362953

You have to go the other way with it. The cable should come to the front of the camera, or up.
 
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Old books about photography often suggested to use two parts of the hand as pliers, in order to avoid shakes while the shutter is triggered. The most frequent suggestion was to use thumb and index in opposition.

This may sound obvious to some degree, but the only way to truly understand how effective it is in balancing the forces applied to the camera and avoid shaking/tilting is to try it out yourself. Simple but tremendously effective.

I use this trick all of the times with 6x9 Super Ikontas, which have a pretty stiff shutter release button, which also happens to be placed on the left side of the camera body (contrary to today standards).

Thanks Marco,

good point, the method seems to help with my Super Ikonta. :smile:

Jens
 
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