Any Substitute for Ferrotyping Solution?

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jolefler

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I'm "almost there" getting evenly finished glossy FB prints off my drier. Almost isn't good enough, though, as some pitting is evident in small areas of most prints.

Just keeping the chrome plate polished & spotless isn't getting it done. Can the plate be waxed, or a drop or two of Photo-Flo in the final soak? Sure would like to skip the step of hunting down the "official solution" if possible.

Jo
 

Nicholas Lindan

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Little spots are often due to little bits of lint or grit getting between the drum and the print. Try filtering and the final bath and wiping the drum clean with a lint-free cloth before each print.

I take it you are using Pakosol or some other glossing and flattening formula. 2 oz of glycerin in a quart of distilled water has been mentioned as a Pakosol substitute.
 

Ian Grant

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There's a whole host of formulae in my BJP Almanacs and Ilford MAnulas I'll dig some out tomorrow. iused quite a fgew in the late 60's very early 70's and they worked well.

Ian
 

john_s

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If I remember correctly, Kodak Glazing Solution contained formaldehyde, which has an unmistakable odour.
 

Lopaka

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When we did this in the studio years ago, we used Photo-Flo. Soak the prints for a minute or two, same concentration as recommended for film.
 

Anscojohn

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I'm "almost there" getting evenly finished glossy FB prints off my drier. Almost isn't good enough, though, as some pitting is evident in small areas of most prints.

Just keeping the chrome plate polished & spotless isn't getting it done. Can the plate be waxed, or a drop or two of Photo-Flo in the final soak? Sure would like to skip the step of hunting down the "official solution" if possible.

Jo
******
Yes, iirc ferrotype polish contained just carnauba wax in a denatured alcohol solution. Of course, you are cleaning and polishing the ferro plates with Bon Ami Bar soap, correct?
 

Captain_joe6

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My bottle of Kodak Ferrotype Plate Polish lists the ingredients as: Carbon Tetrachloride and Paraffin Wax. There seems to be an excess of paraffin in both the bottles I have, as there is always a thin film of wax on top after they've sat for a while. I also have a bottle of Kodak Print Flattening Solution, which is also useful with ferrotyping. Some older info I have lists a similar mixture is 2oz. glycerine in 32oz. distilled water, with a dash of Photoflo 200. Edwal still makes their equivalent solution, available from Freestyle.

Hope this all helps.
 

Ian Grant

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Two things can be bought local and made up/used.

The easiest is Bees wax and Turpentine, 45gm wax to a litre of Turpentine.

The other is prepared Ox-gall but this smell awful and is usually prerved with a small amount of Formaldehyde, this was sold commercially until RC papers really killed glazing for commercial D&P work. It is possible to prepare your own Ox-gall, I have the directions somewhere but it's not pleasant :D

Ian
 

Anscojohn

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[ It is possible to prepare your own Ox-gall, I have the directions somewhere but it's not pleasant :D

Ian[/QUOTE]

********
Step I. Gall thy ox 'til he be completely unsettled.......
Step II: Run away.
Step III. Collect thyself, and go ye to olde camera shop....:tongue:
 
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jolefler

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No, no Ox Gall for me...thanks!

I'd like to be living here at home through the Holidays & not banished to the garage.

Thanks for looking that up, Ian! I'm going the beeswax/turps route after I mix up some glycerin/fotoflo. I'm guessing one would polish the plate with that wax before drying.

Oh, John...no I'm not using the Bon Ami bar soap, rather a window cleaning solution & microfiber. I remember Bon Ami from the catalogue studio years ago.

I am getting lucky with a few prints not using anything, but both these compounds should help enormously, I'd imagine.

Any thoughts leaving the plate in contact with the drier canvas while pre-heating, then squeegeeing the print on it, or should I be squeegeeing it on a freshly polished cold plate, then placed on the drum. Maybe I'm overthinking this whole thing

Jo
 
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My bottle of Kodak Ferrotype Plate Polish lists the ingredients as: Carbon Tetrachloride and Paraffin Wax. There seems to be an excess of paraffin in both the bottles I have, as there is always a thin film of wax on top after they've sat for a while. I also have a bottle of Kodak Print Flattening Solution, which is also useful with ferrotyping. Some older info I have lists a similar mixture is 2oz. glycerine in 32oz. distilled water, with a dash of Photoflo 200. Edwal still makes their equivalent solution, available from Freestyle.

Hope this all helps.

Carbon Tetrachloride is a very dangerous substance.
http://msds.chem.ox.ac.uk/CA/carbon_tetrachloride.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_tetrachloride
 

Martin Reed

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Not many people know this - Tetenal Mirasol 2000 also operates as a glazing solution if used at higher strength. Normal diution is 1+400, for glazing use it at 1+40. You have to look at the small print.
 

Anscojohn

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The old lab rats told me the reason for the Bon Ami Cake is that it is a tallow-based soap; it leaves a residue which helps in the glossing.
 
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