For Sale 35mm Pax M2 camera with case

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Karl K

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Selling my Pax M2 as a display camera, only.
The shutter doesn't open and the focus ring moves stiffly, but the image in the rangefinder does not move.
This looks great as a display piece.
Original metal lens cap, UV filter, and case are included.
The leather case needs some stitching.

Maybe you can fix it or give it a nice home?

$35 + $8 shipping



The Pax M2 was the second in the Pax series of compact fixed-lens 35 mm rangefinder cameras made by Yamato in the 1950s. The main difference from the previous model is to the shutter, which is now cocked automatically by advancing the film. The film advance knob is also improved. The name is engraved on top of the rangefinder housing, together with the serial number. 'Pax' is impressed in the leatherette of the back.

Specifications

  • Type: 35 mm fixed-lens coupled rangefinder camera.
  • Format: 24x36mm on 135 cartridge film.
  • Manufacturer: Yamato Kōki Kōgyō
  • Years of production: c1956[1]
  • Lens: Luminor Anastigmat 1:3.5 F=45 mm; a coated triplet.
  • Shutter:
    • Rim-set leaf shutter. 1/10 - 1/300 sec plus B. Cocked by film advance. No delayed action. Shutter-cocked indicator (red spot in window on top of the lens).
    • Synchronised for flash with a PC socket and switch for F- or X-synch.
  • Viewfinder: Reverse-galilean viewfinder.
  • Focusing:
    • Coupled rangefinder in superstructure on the top plate, giving double-image focusing in the viewfinder (cf the Pax 35 which has separate VF and RF). Rangefinder baseline approx. 40 mm.
    • Knurled finger-knob on lens and knurled focus ring (cf plain ring on the Pax 35). Scale in feet, from 3 ft to infinity.
  • Film advance: Knob-wind, with frame counter around base of knob. Film-type reminder dial in hub of advance knob.
  • Film rewind: Rewind knob. Button to release the film for rewind is behind the shutter release.
 

Attachments

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AgX

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For those in my part of the world, who may have got puzzled by this:
Yes, there were 2 "Pax" designated, very different cameras, resp. camera ranges... The other Pax one made by Braun in Nuremberg. Moreover Braun used the prefix "Pax-" on most of their other products, which over here makes one think of them immediately.

This japanese one being the far better camera.
 
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albada

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Karl, You might want to add a picture of this Pax M2 next to another camera to illustrate its small size.

Also, all grease in early Pax cameras harden with age, which is why the focus is stiff, so a clean-and-relube of all moving parts is in order before shooting with it.
 

AgX

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Due to its design I expected it being sized as a Leica. Am I mislead by this, and the omission of the FP shutter yielded a much smaller size?
 

albada

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Due to its design I expected it being sized as a Leica. Am I mislead by this, and the omission of the FP shutter yielded a much smaller size?

Here are both on my counter.

LeicaVsPaxM2.jpg


AgX, you were correct: the Pax camera is narrower due to a leaf shutter instead of an FP shutter. And they're a bit shorter also.

These Pax cameras were made by Yamato, and were second-tier in both sales and quality. Their f/3.5 lenses are triplets which, in my experience, range from decent to poor in optical quality. Their f/2.8 lenses were 4-element Tessar clones which were decent. However, the base plate in their shutters had a weak spot, so if the camera was bumped on its nose (lens), the base plate would bend. The shutter might still function fine, but optical quality would be poor due to shifted lens-elements. The bent base plates can be straightened, but one must ask, "Why bother?"
 

AgX

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Thank you for the comparison and for considering people like me. Looking at this, I only can say "what fool I am".

I only looked at the first of Karl's small photos, then at its completely different german name-counterpart, and my first thought was the japanese being some vague Leica copy. Even Karl's hint at the leaf shutter did not ring a bell...
 
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