2x3 Film Scanning?

Discussion in 'Scanning and Scanners' started by saman13, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. saman13

    saman13 Member

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    Ran into a problem I hadn't thought about. I knew that 2.25x3.25 cut film is smaller in vertical dimensions than 120 film, but I hadn't thought about the fact that it is not large enough to sit in the negative carrier of my epson V600 scanner.

    Do any of you scan 2x3 cut film? I scanned mine just laying it flat on the glass, but I was wondering if anyone knew of a better solution.

    If there isn't an easier way, I might just make wet prints and scan the finished print (which might be a better idea anyway as far as quality and character is concerned).

    Thanks, y'all.
     
  2. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Sam,
    I have a 4870 and a film holder for 2.25x2.25. It holds strips of film that are about three frames long. If your scanner has a similar holder it should hold a cut film of 2x3. there would be open space on the 2 inch side try a mask that would accommodate that (perhaps with artist's tape). It is my understanding that the scanners are designed for the film to sit away from the glass unless it is one that can be used with liquid in which case the film would be against the glass.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  3. jim10219

    jim10219 Member
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    I scan all sheet film, regardless of size, directly on the glass using a wet mount system. For my scanner, I get the sharpest resolution that way. Using any form of mount reduces resolution because it takes the film away from the plane of focus. Each scanner is different, however. So you have to test your own scanner to see where it works best.

    One thing you might consider is using the negative carrier as the film holder for scanning. I've done that as well, but only for DSLR scanning. Still, I don't see why it wouldn't work for a scanner, so long as you left the bottom part open so the scanner can calibrate itself during exposure. You could also build your own DIY scanning holder using black card stock. Get it in the appropriate thickness, and then cut out a pair of holes to align up with the edges of the negative. Then tape them together as if the tape was a hinge using some strong tape (I use Gorilla tape for this).
     
  4. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber
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    Many scanners require that the negative holder have a specifically sized and located calibration window in them.
     
  5. OP
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    saman13

    saman13 Member

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    My scanner has a medium format film holder, but 2.25x3.25 cut film is shorter than 120 film, so it just falls right through. I think I'll try the homemade negative carrier idea too.

    I think wet printing and scanning might be the best bet though. Because if I like it enough to scan it, I probably want a print of it too. And it is easier to scan a print than a sheet of film anyways.
     
  6. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber
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    If you had an extra medium format film holder, you might be able to build up the frame and holder with something like silicon caulking.
    At least the film is likely to be stiffer than roll film.
     
  7. Thorpelyon

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  8. juan

    juan Subscriber
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    Following a suggestion on largeformatphotography.info a dozen years ago, I went to a picture frame store and bought two pieces of anti-glare picture frame glass. This is rather thin stuff. I had them cut to fit the bed of the scanner. Put one on the scanner glass with the etched side up, put the negative on top and use the second piece of glass to flatten the negative. The etched side is down. The glass raises the negative into focus and the etched sides of the glass help prevent Newton’s rings. Tape down the negative frame that came with the scanner so that it will see the appropriate scanner areas.
     
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