Fiber Print Washers

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David Ruby

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Looking at the Paterson washers on Ebay and elsewhere, it just donned on me that they don't seem to seperate the prints from one another. Is this true? Is this why the NOVA and other mfr. washers are so much harder to find and more expensive?

I guess with the long wash times, it doesn't really matter if they were seperated, you'd just have to start your wash clock when the last prints is put in right?
 

John McCallum

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IMO it is important that FB prints are separated for washing - I always do that. I suspect that the reason Nova washers are harder to find because 1. there fewer of them around generally, and 2. they are very good, and people aren't likely to sell them because they wish to change to a better method.

Personally I suspect they are able to charge a higher price for the clever design. It seems less likely to be because of the cost to manufacture or cost of materials (imo). If you can afford to buy one - do it. If you can't easily afford one, making your own would be quite feasible.
Either way, they have a lot going for them....
- Relatively low volumes of water req'd to obtain archival washing stds.
- Set and forget 1 .... 2.....3 hrs, no problem.
- Consistent & reliable results - this is important esp if you are selling prints.
- Small footprint.
- They tease you by showing and wiggling the print as it washes :smile:
 

Konical

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Good Afternoon, David,

I own a Patterson print washer. The prints are separated in a vertical rack. The unit does a good washing job, but it's tempermental. The action is derived from a water-driven piston/plunger device which is supposed to hit the top edge of the rack at regular intervals. I've had it work well, and I've also had considerable difficulty getting it to work at all. I finally bought a Versalab, which, so far, has been much more satisfactory, as well as being better built.

Konical
 

dancqu

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David Ruby said:
I guess with the long wash times, it doesn't really matter if they were seperated, you'd just have to start your wash clock when the last print
is put in right?

From my reading and study of the counter-current slot type archival print
washers, they are more trouble than they are worth. Worst of all they do
not guarantee a through wash. Many who use them keep the water
running for hours, even overnight. Then there are bubble troubles
and I don't know what all else; leaks, cleaning, etc.

Following the second fix, use a rinse, hca, and rinse. Then place the
print or prints in a tray using hydrophobic seperators. Be sure to
have a seperator on bottom and on top of the stack. I suggest
three or four cycles. Two trays are needed.

This method is the diffusion way of print washing. As described it is
my variation of an age old and time tested way of print washing.

You should'nt be out more than a buck or two giving it a try. Dan
 
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