Yet another “Old Film” thread.

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Ira Rush, Feb 24, 2009.

  1. Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    OK, OK,…. yes I know, I know, yet another “Old Film” thread.

    Perhaps this along with the hourly KEH thread will drive many APUG members over the edge, but I’ll ask it anyway!

    Recently found some long forgotten film, tucked away in an old camera bag in my garage. Which means cold in the winter, hot humid in the summer here in New Jersey. (Hey don’t laugh, someone has to live here!)

    The rolls that I found were:

    3 - 120 rolls of Pan-X (expiration dates of (1) @ 1983, and (2) @ 1988
    2 – 35mm rolls of Pan –X (exp.date of 1988)
    3 – 35mm rolls of Tech Pan (1 @ exp. 1984 and 2 @ 2002

    Well, the 83 and 84 stuff are out of the mix; I’ll keep them as a “museum piece”, but the others, the 88 and 2002…

    … Any idea what speed I should shoot at, given the age of the film and how likely there will be fog.
    I know that slow B&W holds up better than faster speed film, but I still think that some exposure compensation is in order.

    Now I don’t remember where I saw this but I vaguely remember reading…

    … Adding about 1 stop exposure per decade, then process normally…

    Anyone ever hear of this before? Assuming that is correct, that would put the Pan-X (20 years old) from a nice grain free 32 to 125, which seems a waste, considering I could use my Plus-X or FP4 PLUS .

    The Tech-Pan (7 years old) would then jump also from a grain free 25 to 50, which is likewise a waste, as I could use Pan-F.

    I do have the technical insert sheet in the box of Pan-X, regarding exposure and development, and if the film were new those listings would be on target. However considering its over 20 years old any suggestions as to what developer, dilution, and time etc., etc. should I use, that would give a better shot at getting some results along with the difference in film rating settings?

    As for the Tech Pan, now that Technidol has gone Bye-Bye, any ideas or insights into using Rollie RLC, and again what dilution, time etc., etc.

    Any help would be appreciated!
     
  2. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    Ira, one thing I don't understand is why bother using them. They're not the last rolls on earth. And even if Pan-X or Tech Pan were great when they were available, they're not great when seriously expired. Oh, and one more thing... If you need to add 1 more stop of exposure per decade, a 25ISO film will become 12ISO, not 50...
     
  3. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    What I would do: take the 35mm rol of Pan-X, take a couple of shots and then cut these shots and load onto/into (?) your reel and develop.
    Expose the shots as +2, normal dev times in your standard developer.
    Save the rest of the 35mm for later testing and/or shots.

    When you get the results you want you can use the rest of the films accordingly.
    The film from 2002 should not pose too many problems: just standard exposure and dev.

    Peter
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Ira Rush

    Ira Rush Member

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    You're right, I goofed, but still need some advice!

    Anon,

    Yes I goofed, thanks for pointing out my reverse thinking.
    Looks like I need to go back to Photography 101 :D

    Still need advice on the films though.
     
  5. RidingWaves

    RidingWaves Member

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    I did a roll of 1983 Pan-X 120 shot at 16 (+ 1 stop) dipped in Microdol-x 1:0 for the Kodak original packaging recommended amount and was pretty close if not as spot on as I my processing allows. Bit more grain than when it was new, but well within tolerances (not much) and very very smooth tones in general. I'd really recommend trying a bit like that, older film seems to like a bit more stronger exposure/development.