Wildflower options-Film

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mark

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I was wondering what you folks would use to shoot wildflowers. I plan to use Provia 100F and Velvia but was curious about what others, who partake in wildflower hunting, use?
 

roteague

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mark said:
I was wondering what you folks would use to shoot wildflowers. I plan to use Provia 100F and Velvia but was curious about what others, who partake in wildflower hunting, use?

I use the same choices, but my images are more along the lines of "fine art" than "scientific". If you are intested in as accurate colors as possible, you may wish to experiment with more neutral films.
 

jd callow

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IF shooting chromes and semi macro's (meaning longer exposures due to bellows extension) then I would avoid Velvia. If big bold colour is your goal use provia, e100vs or e100g or gx. The Kodak films handle long exposures much better.
 

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A white umbrella seems to help in mid-day sun.

Best,

Will
 

waynecrider

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It seems like among other things the end use and output would have alot to do with a pick. I like Provia myself, have yet to re-experiment with Astia, but for prints am looking towards trying some Kodak VC to compare to UC. If your shooting 35mm, alot of people seem to like UC which is available thru Walmart in a three pack. If anything, when shooting slide film watch the color temp for neutrals.... I see alot of Velvia stuff since it's obviously very popular for landscapes and flowers, but the speeds are so slow that for anything macro to get dof you have to shoot too slow with wind problems being a nuisance. If prints are small try the 400 speeds.
 
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mark

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Looks like I will have to look into the kodak stuff. I wil be shooting 4x5 transparency and usually shoot provia 100F. I just don't like the look when I shoot in low light. That is why I planned on using Velvia.

I detest grain or anything representing it that is why I shoot the slow speeds and with a big camera.

woohoo I can't wait. One month to go.
 

roteague

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mark said:
Looks like I will have to look into the kodak stuff. I wil be shooting 4x5 transparency and usually shoot provia 100F. I just don't like the look when I shoot in low light. That is why I planned on using Velvia.

Keep in mind that Velvia 50 doesn't react the same way as the Velvia 100F. My understanding is the 100F is more like Provia.
 
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mark

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I tried velvia 100F and was not very impressed. But I have not tried it with flowers.
 
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mark

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miou

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mark said:
I was wondering what you folks would use to shoot wildflowers. I plan to use Provia 100F and Velvia but was curious about what others, who partake in wildflower hunting, use?

For my taste, I'd go for any of the following:

Provia 100F
Kodak E100GX
Kodachrome PKR 64 (YES it takes time to develop, but the colours are UNIQUE)
 

c6h6o3

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mark said:
I was wondering what you folks would use to shoot wildflowers. I plan to use Provia 100F and Velvia but was curious about what others, who partake in wildflower hunting, use?

Ektachrome 64T (aka EPY). For my money it's the best film manufactured today and the best product Kodak makes.
 

jd callow

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c6h6o3 said:
Ektachrome 64T (aka EPY). For my money it's the best film manufactured today and the best product Kodak makes.

This film is tungsten balanced....

Correct me if I am wrong, but I think Mark is shooting 4x5. This would make all the recommendations for Kodachromes lees than pertinent.
 

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mrcallow said:
Correct me if I am wrong, but I think Mark is shooting 4x5. This would make all the recommendations for Kodachromes lees than pertinent.

Well, if he's shooting using anything else other than 35mm, PKR/PKL (Kodak's Kodachrome series-K14 proccess) are useless
 
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mark

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c6h6o3 said:
Ektachrome 64T (aka EPY). For my money it's the best film manufactured today and the best product Kodak makes.

You are not the first to recomend this to me. What filter do you use to balance it for daylight use?
 

jd callow

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You could use EPR or EPN the daylight brothers of EPY. These films are very neutral/natural colour films. They do not add much contrast or punch, unlike the others mentioned. They also exhibit more grain the others.
 
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mark

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Nah. Grain bad. If I wanted grain I'ld shoot 35mm.
 

c6h6o3

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mark said:
You are not the first to recomend this to me. What filter do you use to balance it for daylight use?

85B. If you are shooting 4 x 5, that is all the more reason to use EPY, as it's available in Readyload format.

It has much less contrast and a much longer scale than it's daylight brethren. Even other Kodak tungsten balanced chrome films (such as 160T) are harsh by comparison.
 

jd callow

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c6h6o3 said:
It has much less contrast and a much longer scale than it's daylight brethren. Even other Kodak tungsten balanced chrome films (such as 160T) are harsh by comparison.
That is very true. It is also one of the reasons many use it for copy work (that and the natural rendition of colour). It also has some of the best reciprocity characteristics of any chrome you could use.
 

mfobrien

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mark said:
that shot is impressive. That was low light right?

Nope, that was a sunny afternoon. Shot with a Minolta X-700 and a Tamron 80-210 zoom with a diopter. I had seen the poppies a month or so earlier, and was dtermoned to get some shots of the seed pods later. Spent a couple of hours trying to get best shots of them.
Glad you like it!
 

c6h6o3

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mrcallow said:
That is very true. It is also one of the reasons many use it for copy work (that and the natural rendition of colour). It also has some of the best reciprocity characteristics of any chrome you could use.

It's the best thing Kodak makes. Yes, including Azo. Use it before it goes away, as surely must all great films at some point. With the use of scanning digital backs replacing it for copy work, it's probably not long for this world. Architectural photography may be the only thing keeping it going now.

It's also available in 8 x 10, another check in the "+" column.
 

WarEaglemtn

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Velvia 50 for saturation & DisneyColor.
Astia 100 for neutral rendering.
 
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