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Julian

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I've recently read that Weston 'waxed' his prints. Has anyone any pointers where I can get info on this process?
 

Joe Lipka

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I believe that Light Impressions carries something they call Renaissance Wax. I believe this is the type of wax used on photographs. I think Strand used varnish on some of his work.

I've tried it on my platinum prints. I didn't think it made much difference.
 

clay

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I wax gumovers with Gamblin Cold Wax Medium. I get a clean t-shirt, dip some wax out, and rub it on the print. After it is covered, I buff first with another piece of T-shirt material and then finish it off with a horsehair shoe shine buffing brush. It will add a little Dmax and a little pop to your shadow contrast. Frankly, I don't see the point with traditional silver prints, but it can give matte hand coated prints a little more 'presence'.
 
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Julian

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Thanks Clay.
I'm building some triptichs mounted on wooden panels and I'm using fineart paper for the prints so I'm trying for a tad more dmax and slight sheen. I've been using beesway and using an iron to melt the stuff on but it isn't working too well.
 

clay

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The Gamblin wax is a lot easier to use, since you don't need heat it or anything. It doesn't appear to be gooey or soak through paper, but just gives a nice slightly shiny surface that sits on top of the paper. I like it for gumovers because it makes the highlight 'sheen' about the same as the shinier shadows (Because the gum layer is thicker in the more dense areas of the print). I know other people use Renaissance wax, but it seemed to have a stronger petrochemical smell to it when I opened the can, so I just stuck with the Gamblin, which seems to work fine. I know that a lot of painters use the stuff, so I assume it's track record is okay.

Another trick is to use Liquetex gloss acrylic medium diluted 1:10 with distilled water, and just dip the entire print in it. This finish is even more subtle, but I measured about a .1 to .15 increase in Dmax on some platinum prints that I treated in this way.
 

sanking

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clay said:
is okay.

Another trick is to use Liquetex gloss acrylic medium diluted 1:10 with distilled water, and just dip the entire print in it. This finish is even more subtle, but I measured about a .1 to .15 increase in Dmax on some platinum prints that I treated in this way.

What kind of product is this and where do you purchase it?
 

Jorge

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Let me ask, how about paraffin. Here in Mexico they sell candles with very pure paraffin, the candles are very, very white. So I was thinking this would be a good "wax" if applied thin enough and polished well.
 

clay

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>What kind of product is this and where do you purchase it?

It is available in every art store I've ever been in. It is Liquitex Acrylic Gloss Medium. It is used like a gesso substitute, I think. Sort of a blueish white pasty stuff that once diluted is pretty watery. Gives a subtle bump to your prints.
 

Bruce Osgood

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There is an Art Supply Store product called Crystal Clear. It is made by Krylon and will 'go on clear - stay clear', that I've tried just once. It works. It will add dMax and a layer of protection and is moisture proof. It is an acrylic spray that does not contain fluorocarbons.
If you choose to try this I would suggest a throw away finished print before committing to a finished display print.
 

Annie

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Liquitex the brand name of company that makes a wide variety of artists colours and mediums. The Acrylic Gloss Medium is basically an acrylic polymer emulsion for thinning and glazing, and as such has the same archival issues. It comes in two basic types for rigid or flexible surfaces and can be diluted in water, once dry it cannot be removed.
 

Annie

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Clay.... It turns out that synthetic varnishes and polymer mediums were not the boon to the art world as was first thought in the '60s. Art conservators began seeing problems with yellowing, bloom & dead looking surfaces on artworks. It was most apparent in cases of coating.
For platinum printers that are using PVAs similar problems could occur within 10 years. (I have read some of the research done on PVAs by conservators at the National Gallery of Canada.)

I have a bottle of older polymer medium similar to Liquitex that has turned yellow... This would probably not be very noticeable when used as a pigment extender but used undiluted as a glaze it would be. Although manufactures have apparently improved polymer medium formulas there is still doubt and some artists have moved away from synthetic varnishes and returned to traditional resins for coating. I guess each artist must decide if it is an 'issue' or not.... Sorry if I sounded cryptic or alarmist.... Not my intention.
 

Annie

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Aggie, Much older than 5 years, I have a tendency to hoard art supplies even if they are no longer useful...... these days I am even removing emulsions from long outdated FB papers to use for substrates for practicing Alt Processes... they take the coatings beautifully but are probably not archival.... Cheers.
 

clay

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The liquitex bottle claims to be non-yellowing. Probably at least as believable as the claims for 80-100 year life on 'archival pigment inks' . At the extreme dilution I use the stuff, I'm not really worried. The paper will probably start yellowing long before that stuff does.
 

Ka

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What does the term

DMAX

mean?



ka
 

Ka

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I have heard good things about Renaissance Wax. Does anyone use this product? and, what's the best application method?

ka
 

Joe Lipka

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I used it about twelve years ago. I used a slightly moistened cotton ball and applied in circular strokes. Buffed with another cotton ball.

Archival? Golly the prints were waxed in the last millenium and they still look good!
 
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