To quote Homer...

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by wiseowl, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. wiseowl

    wiseowl Member

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    DOH!

    After a few months enforced exile from the darkroom I finally managed to get some "red light" time. I figured this would be a good time to try out 16X12 fibre, so bought some Ilford MG.

    After a few test prints I was struggling to get a decent black, and the print looked much flatter than normal. Then it hit me, I've bought Matt instead of gloss! As I said earlier DOH!

    So, what, if anything can I do to improve the Dmax, (To answer the usual, it was fresh dev at 20C, and I deliberately overexposed some prints but to no avail.) The deepest black I can achieve is just a dark gray, charcoal I suppose, and I really don't like what I'm seeing. I'm very peed off with myself at the moment, £40 down the pan because I didn't read a label. Ouch!

    Any and all suggestions welcome.

    Thanks

    Martin
     
  2. clogz

    clogz Subscriber

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    Hello Martin,
    You could try selenium toning. This usually increases Dmax.

    Hans
     
  3. m_liddell

    m_liddell Member

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    Sell it on ebay?
     
  4. TPPhotog

    TPPhotog Member

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    Keep it and use it for people and flower subjects.
     
  5. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    There are I believe in Adam's book the print some formulas for print varnish that if I remember will increase black desnity and print reflectance.

    When you quoted Homer I imagine this was the Homer of Homer and Jethro fame...thats the only Homer is it not?
     
  6. Kirk Keyes

    Kirk Keyes Member

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    You could try waxing the surface to increase the Dmax - just like some of the platinum people sometimes do. I can't guarantee you will not end up with a waxy mess... but a smoother surface is the key to Dmax.

    See the current Phototechniques mag that just came out for an explaination of Dmax and paper surface.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    wiseowl

    wiseowl Member

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    Thanks to all for your suggestions. Having lived with the prints for a day and mounted one, have had another play with it on some old portraits I think it's a look I could learn to like, for the right subjects of course. I still have a way to go before I learn to get the best out of it, but hey isn't learning half the fun.

    Claire, I haven't read "Homer and Jethro", but if he ever said Doh! then that'll do for me LOL.

    Cheers all

    Martin.
     
  8. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    hi martin

    If you have matt paper no problem, Try printing a bit heavier than normal and then use bleach sepia to increase the contrast. The dry down prints look very nice and I use this combination on a regular basis.
    Works very nicely with nudes, still lifes, mood images.
     
  9. gainer

    gainer Subscriber

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    OK, now we know. You don't read Homer and Jethro. You would have seen them on screen.