Slow RC Paper for BW Prints

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Lobalobo

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One exposes for a slight fog in order to raise the paper's response past the minimum threshold amount for creating any tone. Less than that exposure, there is often nothing visible. Past that threshold, the results of unwanted exposure become much more visible.
A complete safelight test actually includes a step with a post safelight exposure fogging step as well, for those cases where the safelight exposure is enough to bring the paper to the threshold, but not over.
In each case you are testing for the situation where an unwanted exposure is not enough to form an image alone, but is still enough to change the tone and contrast of a printed image.

Very informative. Thanks.
 
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Lobalobo

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If light leaks in the room are unavoidable, as would be true in a barn for example, you might wish to drape a cloth above the enlarger and trays, thus shadowing the light impinging on that area.

Thanks, but there would be no obvious place for the shade: lights would be coming from more than 20 feet away through grates on the floor (and perhaps some reflected above an automatic garage door that doesn't seal to the wall, also more about 20 feet away). At night, I'm confident that there would be no problem unless a car with headlights on unexpectedly pulls into our driveway, which would ruin no more than one print at a time, but given the distance, I'm hoping to develop even during daylight, which is what made me think of slow paper. All in all, though, the paper seems faster than I expected, so printing may have to be a night time activity.
 

pentaxuser

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Sensitivity that results in relatively similar exposure times, not widely divergent exposure times.
If one paper gives you a good print with a 24 second exposure time, then switching to another paper will not usually require anything less than 6 seconds, or more than 96 seconds.
In essence, you don't have to change your equipment if you use a variety of different papers.

Thanks Matt. So when you say a variety if different papers is this a reference to a variety only within a particular make of paper such as Ilford RC Glossy/ Pearl and Satin i.e. not between RC and FB or even Ilford RC and RCWT? So a different paper would be "different" if it were RC to FB or even RC to RCWT

Is a range of 6 secs to 96 secs for other papers really considered to be "no change" and what is definition of equipment This does seem a very large range to conform to the definition of "not different " and what does "change of equipment" encompass?

Thanks

pentaxuser
 

MattKing

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No oil lamp powered enlargers!
And very few of the 3000 watt Durst commercial production enlargers (or similar).
Sort of like how most cars are designed to run on the same roads - at least 60 mph/100 kph, but not 300 mph/500 kph.
In some cases of course, emulsions are designed to exactly match each other wrt speed.
But mostly, just practically speaking, you can easily use almost all the papers, in almost all the darkrooms, because they have reasonably similar sensitivity.
For instance, no Velox + Kodabromide pairs.
 

pentaxuser

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but given the distance, I'm hoping to develop even during daylight, which is what made me think of slow paper. All in all, though, the paper seems faster than I expected, so printing may have to be a night time activity.
If you sit in your garage with broad daylight outside for say the time you spend on an average printing session I'feel you might be amazed at how light it gets in there even after say 10 minutes

With current papers I fear you may find their sensitivity way too high to avoid fogging but all you can do is try At night I'd put one sheet in a box, set up the enlarger and then try that sheet as a single print, process it and let us know how it goes

I agree that with darkness outside however it might well be possible

pentaxuser
 

pentaxuser

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No oil lamp powered enlargers!
And very few of the 3000 watt Durst commercial production enlargers (or similar).
Sort of like how most cars are designed to run on the same roads - at least 60 mph/100 kph, but not 300 mph/500 kph.
In some cases of course, emulsions are designed to exactly match each other wrt speed.
But mostly, just practically speaking, you can easily use almost all the papers, in almost all the darkrooms, because they have reasonably similar sensitivity.
For instance, no Velox + Kodabromide pairs.

Matt I'll try to take the above in the spirit in which I think it is intended 🙂 No follow-up questions needed😄

pentaxuser
 

FotoD

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You could sandwich a large ND gel filter on top of the paper. A 10 stop filter and maybe you could use the enlarger outdoors? :smile:

Or make cyanotypes!
 

albada

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Thinking about this problem a little more, I realized that if it were me in my garage, with light arriving from various directions, I would surround the darkroom-area with black plastic sheeting used for landscaping, held up by a frame of 2x2 lumber. It would cover all sides, and have a sheet plastic roof -- at an angle to prevent sawdust from termites from piling up. ☹️
 
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Lobalobo

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Thinking about this problem a little more, I realized that if it were me in my garage, with light arriving from various directions, I would surround the darkroom-area with black plastic sheeting used for landscaping, held up by a frame of 2x2 lumber. It would cover all sides, and have a sheet plastic roof -- at an angle to prevent sawdust from termites from piling up. ☹️

Thanks for this suggestion. Originally, I was planning to build a sealed darkroom within the garage, but gave up on that as impractical. It hadn't occurred to me to do something along the lines you suggest, putting up a screen between the light leaks (which are all from one direction) and the enlarger and trays. Thanks.
 

momus

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This is what I used to keep my darkroom dark, and what Lobalobo was suggesting. It's very inexpensive, and easy to put up w/ duct tape or whatever. You can use it to block your present light leaks, or just make an area around your work area that is light proof. I should buy another roll or two, it has lots of other uses. If someone is using a bedroom or other carpeted area for printing, this can be rolled out to protect against spills . The 10' width is ideal.

 
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