Shoot the Perseid meteor shower with an FM3a?

Monticello Avenue-3

A
Monticello Avenue-3

  • 0
  • 0
  • 15
surprise!

A
surprise!

  • Tel
  • Feb 7, 2023
  • 2
  • 3
  • 157
Anatomy

A
Anatomy

  • 1
  • 4
  • 177
Morning

D
Morning

  • 0
  • 0
  • 107
BD2023-1.jpg

D
BD2023-1.jpg

  • 0
  • 1
  • 133

Forum statistics

Threads
182,041
Messages
2,519,209
Members
95,480
Latest member
stngoldberg
Recent bookmarks
1

philipus

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2012
Messages
198
Shooter
Medium Format
Hello everyone

I'd like to try to photograph the Perseid meteor shower this weekend with my FM3A and 24/2.8AI.

Unfortunately I have forgotten my cable release. Is the shoot doomed?

Also, any thoughts on exposure times? I have available Portra 160 and Velvia 100.

Thanks a lot in advance.
Philip
 
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
5,467
Location
.
Shooter
Digital
Unless you have a locking cable release or the FM3a has a locking shutter button in bulb, you will not be able to do a time exposure effectively.

Velvia 100 can be used, but it will cast severely due to reciprocity. I use Provia 100F for star trails (EOS 1N and intervalometer -- so I can let the camera do the exposure while I head back to camp and check back on it in the morning!). Provia turns purplish for long exposures, and many photographers like this. Put the camera out where the Perseid shower is expected to appear (research an astronomy forum, or NASA). You will need a stable tripod in a safe place where you can hang out for say 6 hours to create star trails and striations, not necessarily just of the Perseid. Shorter exposures don't really create the interest that thousands of rotating stars do, nor do short exposures provide so much colour compared to the longer ones. A 35mm to 50mm lens at f5.6 for 6 hours on bulb should give you a good result. Don't attempt star trails when there is a waxing gibbous moon as the long exposure will make the scene appear as daylight!
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
philipus

philipus

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2012
Messages
198
Shooter
Medium Format
Thank you very much, that's a very nifty calculator.


And thank you Garyh for this, I appreciate it. I'll shoot from my mother's garden in the rural Swedish countryside so there's very little light pollution and there won't me much moon on the weekend, I believe. The problem is that I don't have a locking shutter button but I'm thinking I'll just put it on bulb and use a baseball cap and then leave it on for a few hours. Worth a shot, or perhaps two if I have the time for it.

Br
Philip

Unless you have a locking cable release or the FM3a has a locking shutter button in bulb, you will not be able to do a time exposure effectively.

Velvia 100 can be used, but it will cast severely due to reciprocity. I use Provia 100F for star trails (EOS 1N and intervalometer -- so I can let the camera do the exposure while I head back to camp and check back on it in the morning!). Provia turns purplish for long exposures, and many photographers like this. Put the camera out where the Perseid shower is expected to appear (research an astronomy forum, or NASA). You will need a stable tripod in a safe place where you can hang out for say 6 hours to create star trails and striations, not necessarily just of the Perseid. Shorter exposures don't really create the interest that thousands of rotating stars do, nor do short exposures provide so much colour compared to the longer ones. A 35mm to 50mm lens at f5.6 for 6 hours on bulb should give you a good result. Don't attempt star trails when there is a waxing gibbous moon as the long exposure will make the scene appear as daylight!
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab Blue Moon Camera & Machine
Top Bottom