seeing in 4x5 and 8x10

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Max

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I generally shoot 8x10, but I recently picked up a Graflex 4x5 Super D.

I've noticed that I tend to approach even static subjects differently with the smaller format. At first I thought it was because I was handholding, but even when I went out with the tripod I was still seeing differently.

Does anyone else do this?
 

noseoil

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I use a 4x5 viewing device made from a brass slide and 4x5 "window" made out of brass rod stock It is a simple slide marked for various lens lengths, but for 8x10 I still use it when set on 150mm (my normal 8x10 lens is 300mm). I find I approach 8x10 differently, many times due to depth of field considerations as much as anything. It is a different way of seeing.
 
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Max

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My wife pointed out that it makes perfect sense to her since I pretty much contact print everything - I guess that could explain it.
 
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Max

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You mostly do people, right? (was looking at people's journals the other day...)

I think that's part of it for me - I've tended to use 8x10 for landscapes, and I've been using the 4x5 with my daughter. When I did take the 4x5 out for some static shots, I still didn't want to do a whole scene, just some more "intimate" compositions that would still look good as a 4x5 contact print.

I'm not sure that makes sense...
 

eclarke

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Sometimes there are nuances which the 8x10 will catch and it presents a shot I would not take with my 4x5..Evan
 

raucousimages

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When doing portraits and nudes DOF and amount of detail are factors in picking 4x5 or 8x10 also how mutch I will be moving the camera during the shoot and the amount of space I have if i am in someones home. Outdoors I tend to use 8x10 for open vistas and 4x5 for macro work. I love shooting small plants, mushrooms things like that with the tripod centerpost reversed and the camera hung upside down. That is impracracle with the 8x10 because the rear standard hits the ground. When Ansel Adams was asked what camera he used (He perfered discussing technique to equiptment) he said "the biggest one I can carry" The fact is I will not be able to cary an 8x10 for ever so I use it alot when I still can.
 

tim atherton

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I have also found I see and approach work differently from 4x5 to 8x10. I think there are a whole series of different things that come into play to do that - such as:

The greater level of subtle detail you know you will get in 8x10 vs 4x5.

The difference in viewing the scene. To me there is a huge difference to squinting at the "little" 4x5 GG under the dark cloth and standing back under the dark cloth and viewing the whole scen on something as big as my TV screen - to me it just leads to a different way of seeing the scene.

Different DoF/shutter speed choices etc even if you are using equiveleant focal lengths on each format.

etc

Interestingly I often find I don't chose as wide a lens to shoot the same or a similar scene on 4x5 as I chose in 8x10. I frequently use a 90mm lens in 4x5 for cityscapes and landscapes - yet in 4x5 I often find my 250mm lens is by far wide enough for the same work - or a 210mm at the widest. Subtle differences, but still differences.

Also, this old thread I once started over on the LF list on a similar topic - not sure if it ever cleared anything up, but it threw around some of these ideas
http://largeformatphotography.info/lfforum/topic/497098.html
 
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Max

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The difference in viewing the scene. To me there is a huge difference to squinting at the "little" 4x5 GG under the dark cloth and standing back under the dark cloth and viewing the whole scen on something as big as my TV screen - to me it just leads to a different way of seeing the scene.
Yeah - handheld or not, it's just a very different experience.


in 4x5 I often find my 250mm lens is by far wide enough for the same work
I currently only have a 190mm for my 4x5, but I have a 250mm on the way, and would like to make lensboards for some of my 8x10 lenses (although bellows draw will start to be an issue...).
 

tim atherton

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tim atherton said:
Interestingly I often find I don't chose as wide a lens to shoot the same or a similar scene on 4x5 as I chose in 8x10. I frequently use a 90mm lens in 4x5 for cityscapes and landscapes - yet in 4x5 I often find my 250mm lens is by far wide enough for the same work - or a 210mm at the widest. Subtle differences, but still differences.

Darn - before anyone runs out and buys a 250mm for their 4x5....

that should have been "yet in 8x10 I often find my 250mm lens is by far wide enough for the same work - or a 210mm at the widest. Subtle differences, but still differences"
 
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