Rolleiflex light leak problems and one jagged edge.

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malcao

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I have two Rolleiflexes and problems with both.

With a GX the right edge is jagged (same pattern on every frame). (see photo)

and an E2 I will get light leaks on the last 2-3 exposures on the roll (same places on every roll, see photo).
I don't think this is due to development. Jobo drums for two films, and the light leak is only when using the E2.

Anyone else experienced same problems or have a clue what could be wrong?

jagged.jpg
lightleak.jpg
 

CatLABS

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The light leaks do not seem to be something that could have come from the camera, perhaps during loading, also it looks like there is a part of the film that was not developed/fixed properly, as it was not cleared, which leads me to thinks this is a loading issue.

The jagged edge - look inside the camera, in the main chamber, and you will find the rough edge - either a scarred metal piece just where the film touches the chamber, or a piece of felt that has moved and is no in the frames, even if only a little bit.
 

bobmolson

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fogged film

[I agree ,this looks like a loading problem. Check for any surface that could be absorbing UV from any surface and fogging the film White paper is notorious for fluorescent dyes. And of course the obvious not a totally dark darkroom One method to help eliminate, is unload the camera and load the reel in a changing bag , ruling out external light fogging the film .
 

dpurdy

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I got the jagged edges with my FX when it was new, though more on top and bottom. In my camera it is from the very rough paint they used. I actually took a very small fine file and smoothed them out.

If the light leaks happen in the same place on every roll then I have to agree it is being caused in the camera. If the bellows is leaky (there is a small bellows in there) then I don't know why it wouldn't leak light on every frame and the light leak should vary from the camera being in different light situations when using it. Sometimes the light shinning from one side brighter or the other or over all brighter or dimmer should cause a variation in the level of fog. Is it possible that someone once had a flash bracket screwed to the side of the camera then took the bracket off and left screw holes open?
Dennis
 

Hatchetman

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I have a mystery light leak on my Rolleicord Va. Last 1 or 2 frames only. I have taken to closing the viewfinder top on those frames as light may be entering from top somehow. Seems to help though I can't say for certain. I've looked all over the web and talked to camera guys. They said could be hours of labor with no guarantee of success. I just live with it....grudgingly.
 
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In my experience with myself early in my photographic career and seeing others experiences online, most often light leaks in the final few frames of 120 film has nothing to do with the camera.
 

E. von Hoegh

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In my experience with myself early in my photographic career and seeing others experiences online, most often light leaks in the final few frames of 120 film has nothing to do with the camera.

Yep. The film isn't rolled tightly enough.
 

Hatchetman

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In my case, its dead center of the frame (not the edges where light would normally enter). How is that possible? I had experienced Rollei repairmen stumped when I send the images.
 

momus

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Had the same problem on a Rolleiflex. In my case it was user-caused. I had a bad habit of opening the camera in bright sun to unload the film, and the looseness of the film on the spool allowed light to get up under the paper. It happened on the last 2-3 frames of the roll, when it happened, which was often. The "fix" was to unload the camera's film at home in dim light, or better yet, a change bag. If I needed to change rolls when I was out, I tried to find a low light place to unload in, and would tighten up the film on the roll w/ my fingers once it was out.
 

Bob Marvin

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You shouldn't have a problem loading and unloading your Rollei in bright sunlight as long as you turn so that the camera is in your shadow. I've been doing that for 50 years without fogging any film.
 

Dan Daniel

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On the E,check the rollers at the top and bottom of the film gate. If one is sloped or bent, it will cause the film to wind slightly off-kilter. By the time you get to the end of the roll, a minor amount adds up and becomes significant. This will crimp the backing paper a bit against the take-up reel, allowing the kind of soft leak I am seeing.

I see what appear to be marks from the silver gear on the left side of the take-up chamber. Another sign that the film is winding slightly askew, again usually caused by the rollers being out of alignment.

Another thing to check if for missing screws or loose screws There are lots of holes drilled through to the film chamber, with the screw forming the light seal. You can see these little openings on the inside, in the spool and lens area. Sometimes a leak happens at the end of a roll only because the mass of film was shielding most of the leak until it had ended.

Place the film back inside the camera in the original orientation to see if it tells you where the light is coming from. Also check frames before and after- sometimes a frame is fogged while still on the spool or on the take-up side but it looks like it happened while the frame was in the gate.
 
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malcao

malcao

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Thanks for all help and tips :smile:

Living in Sweden there is no risk for loading and unloading in to much light :wink: I checked my negatives from this summer and it seems that there could be a problem with my new Jobo drum.

Regarding jagged edge, I looked closer to the edge (see photo) and maybe this is the problem. Any tips for how to smooth it out?

IMG_0046.jpg
 
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malcao

malcao

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What kind of file did you use and did you apply any black paint afterwards?

I got the jagged edges with my FX when it was new, though more on top and bottom. In my camera it is from the very rough paint they used. I actually took a very small fine file and smoothed them out.

If the light leaks happen in the same place on every roll then I have to agree it is being caused in the camera. If the bellows is leaky (there is a small bellows in there) then I don't know why it wouldn't leak light on every frame and the light leak should vary from the camera being in different light situations when using it. Sometimes the light shinning from one side brighter or the other or over all brighter or dimmer should cause a variation in the level of fog. Is it possible that someone once had a flash bracket screwed to the side of the camera then took the bracket off and left screw holes open?
Dennis
 

Dan Daniel

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What kind of file did you use and did you apply any black paint afterwards?

Be gentle with a file or any other system you use. Best to always pull 'up,' meaning from the bottom to top in your photo. Going down risks catching a paint edge and chipping it away.

Another approach would be very fine sandpaper. Double-stick tape it to a flat (metal, wood, acrylic- stiff) and trim to a clean edge. By fine I mean 1000-1500 grit. Slow, yes, but it beats creating new grooves.

You can use tape to create a small shelf below where you are filing or sanding. Imagine a piece of tape 3 cm in width- crease it at about 1 cm and stick this edge to the wall. With the sticky surface facing up, the shelf being the sticky side of the tape. Now as dust falls, it will fall onto the shelf and stick.
 
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malcao

malcao

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Be gentle with a file or any other system you use. Best to always pull 'up,' meaning from the bottom to top in your photo. Going down risks catching a paint edge and chipping it away.

Another approach would be very fine sandpaper. Double-stick tape it to a flat (metal, wood, acrylic- stiff) and trim to a clean edge. By fine I mean 1000-1500 grit. Slow, yes, but it beats creating new grooves.

You can use tape to create a small shelf below where you are filing or sanding. Imagine a piece of tape 3 cm in width- crease it at about 1 cm and stick this edge to the wall. With the sticky surface facing up, the shelf being the sticky side of the tape. Now as dust falls, it will fall onto the shelf and stick.

Thank you very much for the help :smile:
 
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