Replinished Developer

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John Irvine

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I want to learn about using replinished developer. I've seen several references to it versus diluted developers. I'd like to know Why, What to expect, and how to do it information. I generally use D-76 or HC110 dilution B.

A link to a straight forward reference would be handy.

I tried several searches of this Forum but didn't find much.
 
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You may wish to start with the Kodak web site. Their technical data papers should reveal how to replenish D76 and HC110. I believe HC110 requires a special replenisher, while D76 doesn't. But don't hold me to it.

Search via Google the following string: site:www.kodak.com D76

That should get you the data sheet for D76, etc.
 
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You may also wish to consider Xtol replenished. Its keeping properties, as far as I can tell, are better than D76 or HC-110. When people normally use HC-110 single shot, I think more people than not just mix the concentrate directly before use. While replenishing the instructions are geared towards large tanks and large volumes, and mixing up an entire gallon of replenisher working solution at once. You replenish 22ml per roll of film, and the replenisher has a storage life of 2 months while mixed in a partially full container. You have to process a lot of film to make it work. You could of course make smaller amounts of replenisher and alter the scenario somewhat.
Xtol I have at least tried to use replenished (it is my only current developer). You don't need a specific replenisher, it's all just stock Xtol. And I have kept my batch alive for almost a year now, still alive and kicking well. Three 5L kits have gone through it and I love the results. No problems with activity or the replenisher going bad or anything.

Just something to consider.
 
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You may also wish to consider Xtol replenished. Its keeping properties, as far as I can tell, are better than D76 or HC-110.
Whether Xtol has better keeping properties, I`m not sure. I think that the unique thing about Xtol is that it is it`s own replenisher, while most other developers have a specially formulated replenisher.
 

mablo

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More about using replenished XTOL here:

(there was a url link here which no longer exists)
 
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I've begun using Xtol replenished mostly as a result of previous posts by Mr. Bertilsson, Mr. Grant and others who were very satisfied with that method. The developer is said to mellow out after processing a number of rolls and give very pleasing results. This might be similar to results obtained by the crowd that swears by using Xtol diluted and one-shot, but I don't know.

One advantage of using a replenished developer like Xtol is that you can develop a whole lot of film from a single 5 liter batch and that makes it real cheap.

Dave
 
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John Irvine

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I am familiar with general replinishment of a developer. What I'm trying to find out is the "mellow out after processing a number of rolls and give very pleasing results refered to by Dave in Kansas.
 

Andrew Moxom

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I've just started my first batch of XTOL using the replenished method. From what I understand, the mellowing is from it becoming 'seasoned' Basically, with this being a solvent based developer, it's activity when seasoned is less harsh on the film, so that contrast does not get too high as it can do when completely fresh. I hear the developer is 'seasoned' when about 10 to 12 rolls have been through it.

My approach so far is this. Miux up a 5l batch. Keep 3l as a working solution. I develop between 4 rolls of film spread out between two steel tanks so 2l of developer is being used. When complete, I pour ALL the developer back into the stock container, shake up, then pour out about 75ml of used developer for each roll of film developed. I then replace this amount with FRESH stock solution from the remaining 2l mixed up. Pretty easy in the grand scheme, and so far I am liking the results.
 
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@ John Irvine - the results I have noticed with Xtol is a slightly finer grain, a sharper negative, and a tonality that is not as 'sterile' as with completely new developer. In the shadows I see similar results as with fresh developer, the midtones seem better separated, and the highlights take on a quality that resembles more of something like Rodinal; the highlights seem 'quieter' somehow, calm. Fresh developer, in my opinion, tends to put too much punch in the highlights, making the tonal shifts more abrupt. For some subject matter that may be desirable. But for my work, I prefer the look of replenished developer.

I hope that aids somewhat in explaining the advantages I see to replenishing. Economic reasons aside.
 

Anon Ymous

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I am familiar with general replinishment of a developer. What I'm trying to find out is the "mellow out after processing a number of rolls and give very pleasing results refered to by Dave in Kansas.

That will obviously depend on the volume of developer that you replenish. The larger the volume of your "working solution", the more rolls you'll need to develop to season it. It's about the byproducts of development that make the difference. I searched about it recently, because I'll try replenished Xtol after I finish my D76. Xtol's datasheet mentions a way to season fresh developer by adding developer starters. They mention 3 different chemicals, with different volumes for each. I checked the MSDS for any of them and found out that all of them are basically solutions of Sodium or Potassium salts with halogens. In other words, they're restrainers. You may be able to use a single salt to do exactly the same, but I'm unable to make a guess from the information I found. Figures seem to be too vague and I don't even know the restraining potential of these salts.
 
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