Recommend me a 67mm filter kit

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zowno

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Not sure if this is the right forum section.

I'm looking to buy some 67mm filters. Magenta, Yellow, ND. I'm thinking about going down the square filter/mount option. Does anyone have any easy going, cost effective recommendations?

I use a rangefinder, so that kinda changes the way I use the filters. But I wouldn't mind future proofing my setup come an slr
What do you think?
 

John Koehrer

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IMO square filters and RF cameras don't get along too well. Something about a 3" filter and viewfinder. What are you using that takes 67MM?

Typically screw in or slip on are much less obtrusive. Problem being if you go to an SLR the RF fit
filters aren't going to(fit that is).

Meanwhile, what do you want the filters for? B&W or color? Typical B&W kit would be yellow, green, orange and red.
Color mostly would be correction filters to correct color temperature or balance and many of the ones used won't have
a lot of effect of you're doing negative film.

The ND and polarizer will work with either type film.

There should be several threads about this, the search function is your friend.
 
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zowno

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IMO square filters and RF cameras don't get along too well. Something about a 3" filter and viewfinder. What are you using that takes 67MM?

Typically screw in or slip on are much less obtrusive. Problem being if you go to an SLR the RF fit
filters aren't going to(fit that is).

Meanwhile, what do you want the filters for? B&W or color? Typical B&W kit would be yellow, green, orange and red.
Color mostly would be correction filters to correct color temperature or balance and many of the ones used won't have
a lot of effect of you're doing negative film.

The ND and polarizer will work with either type film.

There should be several threads about this, the search function is your friend.


Thank for the comprehensive answer! I couldn't find a lot of info around about square vs round on a rangefinder.

I'm using a Mamiya 6. Two of the lenses take 58mm and one takes 67mm. So i've bought a step up ring in anticipation.

I'd like the yellow for BW and the Magenta for colour. Just some simple stuff to get me started. I've noticed myself adding magenta to a lot of my shots recently, so I thought I'd combat it at the source
 

AgX

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Magenta filters are scarce anyway. To my mind only come CC-filters and Fluo-lighting filters.
 

Alan Gales

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Since you said cost effective recommendations check Ebay for used filters. I bought all my 77mm round filters used off Ebay. Look for Heliopan, B+W, Hoya HMC and Nikon filters if you decide on round filters. It doesn't hurt anything mixing brands. Buy whatever you find a deal on. :smile:
 

pentaxuser

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. I've noticed myself adding magenta to a lot of my shots recently, so I thought I'd combat it at the source

When you say you notice yourself adding magenta to your shots( colour?) , what does this involve currently?

Thanks

pentaxuser
 
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Use screw-on 67mm filters for the Mamiya 6. Square filters will only add an annoying bulk at the front of the camera, dramatically increase the risk of flare and the poor quality filters will hobble the inherent quality of the Mamiya's optics. Start a collection of 67mm; it's the next most popular size after 58mm.

If magenta is visible in your film (as per the comment, "combat it at its source..."), is it because of processing, poor storage or the effects of heat? Properly identify the cause of this rather than put your faith in a filter to do the (supposed) correction for you.
 
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Sirius Glass

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Use screw-on 67mm filters for the Mamiya 6. Square filters will only add an annoying bulk at the front of the camera, dramatically increase the risk of flare and the poor quality filters will hobble the inherent quality of the Mamiya's optics. Start a collection of 67mm; it's the next most popular size after 58mm.

If magenta is visible in your film (as per the comment, "combat it at its source..."), is it because of processing, poor storage or the effects of heat?

I strongly agree about using screw in filters.

I also agree about the magenta statement. Fix the root cause of the problem rather than use a bandaid.
 

Pentode

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Another vote here for screw-in filters.

I'm not sure what you mean about adding magenta to your shots. If you're talking about color corrections that you're performing digitally, I'd keep that step there and not try to do it with a filter. You'll have a lot more control there.

A good, simple start with filters would be:
UV - cuts haze and protects the lens. Use this all the time when you're not using other filters.
Yellow - adds contrast to B&W and makes the grey tones seem more natural to the eye. Many B&W shooters use a yellow filter the way color shooters use a UV: they never take it off unless they're using another filter.
Polarizer - I won't get into how it works, technically, but the effect is increased contrast and color saturation and a reduction of glare and specular highlights. It takes a little figuring at first, but they can really add a lot to outdoor shooting.

A good, simple second round might include:
1A "skylight" - similar to a UV filter, but it warms up color tones just a bit. It has no significant effect upon B&W, so it's interchangeable with a UV in that application.
Orange - for even more contrast and dramatic skies in B&W.
Red - even MORE contrast and dramatic skies!
ND - enable you to shoot with wider apertures when your film (or sensor) is too fast. I haven't played with these much, so I'm not much of an authority on them.

That's likely all you'll ever need 90% of the time. Sometimes B&W shooters will use green or blue for special effects and studio photographers still using film may use color correction filters for certain types of lighting but the one's I listed above will get you through most situations. When I was shooting more color I used a polarizer quite a bit. Now I mostly shoot B&W and find that I seldom use anything other than yellow or orange. Sometimes I use special infrared filters, but that's an exception.

Have fun experimenting!
 

John Koehrer

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I didn't realize the filters on any RF's were that large.
I learned something new and useful today.

FWIW The color difference in a UV and skylight is very slight and only noticeable with slide films.
The magenta may be useful using daylight balanced film under florescent light but normally CC filters are used(CC30 or CC40M).
 
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zowno

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I strongly agree about using screw in filters.

I also agree about the magenta statement. Fix the root cause of the problem rather than use a bandaid.

On the topic of the magenta filter. I've noticed cinestill 50 has a green cast to it whenever I've gotten it back. I get that it's part of the charm, but I love the colours when I colour correct towards the magenta end of the spectrum. I figured why not get to the source and add magenta in camera!
 
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I didn't realize the filters on any RF's were that large.
I learned something new and useful today.

FWIW The color difference in a UV and skylight is very slight and only noticeable with slide films.
The magenta may be useful using daylight balanced film under florescent light but normally CC filters are used(CC30 or CC40M).

You have a much greater chance of picking up a difference with a skylight/1B filter than a faintly coloured UV(0) or equivalent UV filter. Even Provia, sensitive to small additive colours such as filters, would not show a UV filter, but it would definitely come up pinkish with a 1B.
 
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