RB67 questions?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by stradibarrius, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I stumbled across a RB67 Pro S body w/220 back today for $20.00!
    No lens and no viewfinder. I know there are tons of lenses and finders out there but I have some really basic questions.

    What is the first lens I should get?
    What about a viewfinder?
    Where does the power for a flash come from?
    How do you set the ISO?
    I guess you have to use a hand held meter?

    I got a couple of roll of color film so when I get a lens and a viewfinder I can have some fun!
     
  2. randerson07

    randerson07 Member

    Messages:
    34
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    Pingree Grov
    Shooter:
    35mm
    You will need a meter or you will need to use some form of sunny 16. The power for the flash comes from the flash itself. You do not set the ISO you need to calculate your own exposure with the help of a meter.

    The viewfinder and lens choice will be based upon how much money you have to spend. An AE prism will cost a bit, but a waste level should be found cheap. the standard lens for the RB is an 80 or 90mm the K/L lens are the top of the line, then the Sekor C then the Sekor.

    Ill give you $25 for it.

    KEH.com should have everything you need.
     
  3. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    Tufts Univer
    Shooter:
    35mm
    WHAT??!?!?!?!? Where exactly did you complete your stumblage?

    Get the 90mm Sekor (or Sekor C for better quality but higher price). It's the cheapest and best for starting out. The screen on top is your "viewfinder." You can get sunshade like attachments called "waist level finders" or bulkier prism finders which reverse the image to its proper orientation (the screen is right side up but displays a mirror image.)

    It is completely manual. There are no batteries, no flash, no power of any kind. It's like a giant wind up clock. You advance the film on the film back and then you set your shutter speed and aperture based on the correct conditions. I meter can be helpful, but you could also try the Sunny 16 rule especially if you try shooting negative film. In full sun, use F16 with 1/the ASA speed for the shutter. You can change those to get a wider or smaller aperture. Look it up on wikipedia.

    You do not have a flash; you do not set the ISO. You set your aperture and shutter speed in accordance with the film speed, which must be accounted for either with a meter or with said sunny 16 rule.
     
  4. keithwms

    keithwms Member

    Messages:
    6,255
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Location:
    Charlottesvi
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Typically a 90 or a 127. Look at the mamiyausa site for some handy "35mm equivalents."

    What about a metering pd prism?

    None required from the camera, you just plug in a synch cable. The power is apparently extracted from your aura as you hold the camera.

    You don't. You set the aperture and the shutter speed on the lens. The shutter is in the lens. If you do get a metering prism, you'll see that you need to set the ISO on that. Just like you need to pick an ISO on your handheld exposure meter.

    Not if you get a metering prism finder....

    Oh and pick up a 6x8 back!
     
  5. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Are there any practical considerations as to the choice between a waist level or prism viewfinder? I know that some of the prism finders have a meter but I am really wondering about practical thing like composing the shot.
     
  6. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,154
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I prefer the waist level finder to the prism on my RB but your preference may differ.

    With a rotating back there is no need to turn the camera for vertical shots. Conversly, with my ETRS, I prefer to use a prism as vertical shots are very difficult with a waist level finder.

    Do you know anyone near you with an RB67 system you could try out?

    A lot of these decisions are not only personal preferance but, to some extent, depend on how you are going to use it. e.g. tripod, hand held, macro, landscape, etc.



    Steve.
     
  7. David Brown

    David Brown Member

    Messages:
    3,712
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Earth
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  8. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    David, thanks for the link. I found that last night and printed it out.
    Steve, I am wondering what types of shooting are good with this camera. Weight aside...does this camera work well in low light situtations like sunsets, sunrises or taking long shots of the moon and stars. Long exposures where I would get star trails.
    I am thinking that this camera is going to be wonderful in my little studio taking shots of my violins. Here I think the waist level would be very practical because of the height of the table etc. where I stage the violins.
    What about the change in perspective,waist vs. eye level, when shooting a landscape type shot?
     
  9. archphoto

    archphoto Member

    Messages:
    966
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Holland and
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Welcome to the club !
    Please considder the weight diference between the waistlevel finder and a prism too, both are great to have.
    And just $20,- for the body ? See if everything is OK with it.
    If you don't have a tripod allready: get a sturdy one for those sunsets and your studio.

    Peter
     
  10. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I do have a very good tripod and ball head that I use a lot. I have a good bit of Nikon digital and 35 mm gear but this is my first step into MF and as you know this is a very basic camera as far as nifty features. 35mm has forced me to start learning more about exposure and other aspects of photography befroe digital...and I love it!!!
    I am not put off buy the manual aspect in fact even with my digital camera I always shoot in manual mode.
    I am just trying to figure out how to work around things like no meter. I guess I can buy a handheld meter. Are there other methods to determine exposure with out a meter?
    Sunny 16 works fine in a sunny situtation but what about a sunset or sunrise?
     
  11. archphoto

    archphoto Member

    Messages:
    966
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Holland and
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    You have digi: use it as a sofisticated light meter ! Set it Aperture prefered and go !
    You will probably have to do a bit of testing to get the digi calibrated to your film, but still.......

    Peter

    By the way: you can download a manual for the RB on : www.mamiya.com
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2009
  12. Joe Grodis

    Joe Grodis Member

    Messages:
    201
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Location:
    Wyoming, PA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    $20!! Heck I'd pay that for the Focusing Screen or Cocking lever... $20 is worth it even if it's broke.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I was thinking I would just use the meter in my D80 or F100 to start out.
    Every thing appears to be in fine order...The bellows are in excellent condition and move in and out like silk.
    The back rotates smoothly. The mirror and the interior of the camra look to be in fine shape. The outside shows normal wear. The black finish has worn off in several places but that doesn't bother me at all.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. archphoto

    archphoto Member

    Messages:
    966
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Holland and
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    If you don't own it yet: get it, fast or is it on ebay and bidding ?
    Paint is not a problem, you can fix that your self if you want, and otherwise you will look like a seasoned Pro, nothing wrong with that !
     
  16. KenS

    KenS Member

    Messages:
    415
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Location:
    Lethbridge, S. Alberta ,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You might also give serious consideration to a portable sign on which
    you might print

    "NO... it is NOT a Hasselblad"

    :cool:

    Ken
     
  17. keithwms

    keithwms Member

    Messages:
    6,255
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Location:
    Charlottesvi
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think a metering prism is a very good way to go, particularly if you are new to bellows focusing. If so you will encounter bellows factor for the first time. The rb is such a tremendous camera for closeups, you will very soon get into bellows factors. If you want to work quickly at close focus, you will want a metering prism for sure.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I have already bought it. I got it from a local camera store yesterday, I went in to get some 35mm film and saw it sitting on the shelf. I asked how much, we bartered and I walked out the door with the body and a 220 back.

    I am going over to KEH this afternoon and pick up a 127mm, a 120 back and WL finder. If I find I want the prism finder they seem to be everywhere! I was going to get the 90mm lens that they had on line last night but this morning it was gone so I got the 127mm. I hope everyone doesn't come back and say "you should have got a 90mm the 127mm sucks!"
     
  19. Joe Grodis

    Joe Grodis Member

    Messages:
    201
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2008
    Location:
    Wyoming, PA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Be sure to get a Light Meter too no photographer should be with out a few of them.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Does anybody have an opinion of the 127mm f/3.9 opposed to the 90mm as my "normal" lens. All of the paper work I have found reference both as the " Normal" lens for this camera.
     
  21. archphoto

    archphoto Member

    Messages:
    966
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2008
    Location:
    Holland and
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    First of all: YOU ARE ONE VERRY LUCKY GUY !
    90 versus 127: Pentax has a 105 as standard lens so it depends a bit how you look and photograph in general.
    Since I got my 14-28mm zoom for 35 I'm into wide angles, the 50mm is on my whish list for the RB.
    If you can pick-up a good 127 for a good price, and you like the vieuw you get with it (take your RB with you ) buy.
    A good 90 can allways be bought later.......

    Peter
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2009
  22. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,070
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Aurora, Il
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Choice of normal fl lens is apples & oranges. With shooting the instruments the 127mm is IMO the better choice. I've got 50/90/140 combination & it works for me.
    Waist level I have but don't care for & got a magnifying hood. Meter prism came with the camera I bought & it's OK but weighs about 2.5 lbs. It's a big hunk of glass in there.
    Hand held meter is no biggie unless you're close enough to require compensation for bellows extension. There is a scale on the LH side of the camera that shows both DOF & compensation
     
  23. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

    Messages:
    9,154
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Ryde, Isle o
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Don't worry. I've never heard anyone say that. Most people who have commented on the 127 say it's the best lens they have. I don't have one. :sad:

    The RB67 can do just about anything you want. Tripod mounted studio portrait camera or on location landscape camera. It's great for macro close ups with its extending bellows and additional extension tubes and, if you have the arm muscles for it, it can be a great hand held camera with the left hand grip added.

    I do this with mine despite not having the afformentioned muscles in any form approaching Popeye's (perhaps I need more spinach).





    Steve.
     
  24. keithwms

    keithwms Member

    Messages:
    6,255
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Location:
    Charlottesvi
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The 127 KL is maybe one of the very best and most versatile rb lenses that I have. But can you use a 127 KL on a pre-SD rb? I don't think so. Anyway I suspect that with a hood they pre-KL lenses will come very close to the KLs.
     
  25. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Well I am back from KEH with the 127mm f/3.9 lens, a WLF and a 120 back. I have a 120 and 220 back now. Listening to the shutter/mirror when I pressed the shutter button the first timer sounded great!
    I am really excited about this camera. I have some Tri-X 400 loaded and tomorrow is supposed to be bright sunshine and 60 degs.!
     
  26. OP
    OP
    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2009
    Location:
    Monroe, GA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    What do you do if you need a shutter speed faster than 400?