Push Velvia 100 & Provia 100? Or Just Shoot Kodak E200??

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by brian steinberger, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    I'd like to shoot some color again in my medium format rangefinders. I've been shooting black and white ISO 400 which I believe is the best all around ISO for hand held rangefinder stuff. Anyway, I know about Provia 400, but I think I might be able to get away with ISO 200.

    So it's either shoot Kodak E200 or shoot Velvia 100 or Provia 100 pushed to EI 200. Which would yield better results? I prefer the look of Velvia and Provia, but am not familiar with them when pushed one stop. Is either film as good at EI 200? One better than the other when pushed? And how would either hold up grain-wise to Ektachrome 200?

    Thanks alot!
     
  2. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Why don't you want to use Provia 400X? It is a marvelous film, especially in medium format.

    You can push your lower speed films, but you will have a more contrasty look by doing do. Your dark areas will be darker than if you had used a 400 film.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 4, 2009
  3. keithwms

    keithwms Member

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    Yeah, I really like 400x. And it can be shot well past 400 (check on RFF).
     
  4. OP
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    brian steinberger

    brian steinberger Member

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    I figured the 100 speed films would gain more contrast pushed to EI 200. Velvia is already a contrasty enough film.

    I'm gonna give Provia 400 a chance. Any thoughts on Ektachrome 200?
     
  5. Alexander Ghaffari

    Alexander Ghaffari Member

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    I love Kodak Ektachrome 200 for astrophotography. If I need a faster MF slide than 100 speed, and I am not doing astrophotography, I go with Fuji Provia 400X. It is a marvelous film. Still quite good pushed one or even two stops.
     
  6. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    I've shot Velvia 100F in my Mamiya 7 II rangefinder without having to push to 200 ISO. Best way to tell what works for you is to test all the above for a side by side comparison.
     
  7. accozzaglia

    accozzaglia Member

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    I've shot E200 once (shot at 400), and I was very pleased by the grain and colour reproduction. It's not much like Provia 100 or 400X at all. It's a colour palette that seems ever slightly warmer, though I'm partial to Provia for the work I do.
     
  8. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Member

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    Forgive me if I'm wrong, I'm definitely not a color shooter, but wasn't the E200 made for the underexpose/overdevelop practice?

    I agree that its color palette seems warmer than Provia. But Provia 400 is just awesome film with a great neutral appearance. I think you will get much more satisfying results from Provia 400 than Provia 100 underexposed by one stop. I don't think you'll be disappointed with it Brian.

    - Thomas
     
  9. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    E200 is made to be pushed (1-stop = 320/400, 2-stops is no more than 640, but you'd want to experiment) and has its own very unique look, great tonal range, but it's fairly grainy. I don't know if I've ever shot provia 400 other than crossprocessed. I have shot Provia 100 and it is really excellent film. The only fault I find is that it is a bit cool especially in shadows or in overcast settings.
     
  10. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Subscriber

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    Provia 100 and 400 are both lower contrast films than Fuji's staple shockers, Velvia 50 and 100, implying that you can push/pull Provia with excellent results, but "fit the film to the task". Use Provia 100 in bright daylight with strong shadows, then compare the same thing with Velvia 50/100. Provia can benefit from occasional POL use to intensify a rather muted palette (compared to Velvia's much loved "Disneycolour") but if you need to gain contrast, you're better off just switching films i.e. Velvia for diffiuse to hazy conditions; Provia for point-light, contrasty or long exposures.
     
  11. accozzaglia

    accozzaglia Member

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