print dryer-experiments & discoveries

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by SteveinAlaska, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. SteveinAlaska

    SteveinAlaska Member

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    OK, I just started using a Premier Model 110 dryer that is rated at 325 watts with 110 volts. Curiosity got the best of me and I am posting a little info and am looking for some comments about my efforts. I took a thermometer and checked at what temps the settings are on this dryer.
    This is what I found:
    #1.....120F
    #2.....130F
    #3.....140F
    High.....150F

    I have only Iford Multigrade FB Warmtone fiber paper to work with at this point. But I find that the longer the paper is left in to dry and at the higher temps, the paper comes out flat and does not curl. Even after setting out on a desk for a week the print remains reasonably flat.
    I used negatives from a 35mm, 6X6 & 6X9 cameras in an effort to see if there would be a change in tone ( finish, contrast??) but I don't really have an answer on that. I am satisfied at the end product.

    Final thing, I am leaving a print in from 45 minutes to 1 hour at the High setting ( 150F) to produce the finished print. Does anyone have any thoughts to my efforts here? Thank you.
     
  2. jolefler

    jolefler Member

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    I'm anxious...

    for replies and insights on this topic, as well. I have two driers and have been using them with fair results, but info on "how to" is hard to find.

    I've found 20-30 minutes seems to be enough at medium on a pre-heated drier....sometimes it curls...sometimes not. They usually don't curl at all after I leave them pressed under a few books overnight. Out of the drier and under the weight.

    Ferrotyping was a nightmare until I found that squeegee-ing before AND after the canvas was lowered worked the best.

    Jo
     
  3. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    Personally I find the subjecting of the emulsion to such
    temperatures repellent. I can't imagine such temperatures
    doing the print any good. And for such a lengthy time. Hot
    Presses for the same reason are off my buy list. They
    work at even higher temperatures.

    So, I'm stuck with making the best of corrugated board,
    separator sheets and up to a week under weight. Works
    well though. Some compensation. Dan
     
  4. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    I have the same Premier dryer and don't leave the prints in for more than 5-7 minutes on high for non glossy. For glossy (face down) I leave them on the platen for 10-12 minutes on the medium setting or until they pop off the surface by themselves. They all come out dry and flat for me.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    SteveinAlaska

    SteveinAlaska Member

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    I must mention here that the fabric cover on mine is still discolored even after a visit to the laundry a couple of times. I am taking it over to a company that does tentmaking and awnings to see if they can produce a new cover. I think that I can't remove some of the chemical residue that has impregnated the cloth. The person that gave this to me thought he quit using it " oh sometime in the early '80's". So I am resurrecting a piece of equipment that sat in a basement for many years.
    What I see happening is that my prints will stick to the fabric when I lift the cover and my assumption is that the print should fall loose from cover also.:confused: Should this the case??

    Ah yes, too long and too hot I can understand, so a thank you there.

    OK make the pot of coffee,scratch head and look at dryer.
     
  6. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    A platen rather than a drum dryer. I made a lot of use of
    them many years ago. I've considered using one now that
    I'm back at some darkroom work. Flat dry prints, quickly
    come by, has some appeal.

    To counter fabric cover problems how about interleaving
    twixt the fabric cover and print a sheet of blotter paper
    or a sheet of some suitable easy to clean fabric. Dan
     
  7. jolefler

    jolefler Member

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    Fabric sticking

    I have the same problem with my matte prints. Tiny lint/threads also get buried into the emulsion. They can be removed, but just another step in processing.

    I did try a paper cover over the matte print while on the drier....it became permanently bonded to the emulsion. Fabric may work better; it'll be the next great experiment.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    SteveinAlaska

    SteveinAlaska Member

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    A new cover will only cost around $40, so I gave them the OK to make two covers. I am assuming a piece of white cotton fabric such as a handkerchief or tablecloth or bedsheet would work. I'll give it a try
     
  9. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    I'd first go $4 and give about a half yard of light canvas a try.
    Cut out the sheet sizes needed then not worry about the
    hemming till later. Dan