Polaroid??

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Pasukaru

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Hello,

I own a Polaroid Land 250, but I'm not happy with it... the focus isn't precise and I would like to control the exposure and deep of field like a normal film camera. Please, can you suggest to me some good completely manual polaroid camera with a good lens that fit with the modern polaroid film?

About polaroid format : is always the same format or there are choice like in the film (35mm, 120mm ecc...) ?

Regards.
 

summicron1

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to answer the second part of your question -- no, you are stuck with the limited number of polaroid (now fuji, actually) instant films that fit that camera. It can't be easily adapted for any other film format.

If you shop around you can find a polaroid 180 for a coupla hundred dollars. Their rangefinders are made by Zeiss and are quite good.
 
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Pasukaru

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what about if a get a 4x5 camera with a polaroid film older? Is it a bad idea?
 
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Yes, you can use a Polaroid back on a 4x5 camera, but unless you want to be scrounging for film on eBay, be sure to get the sort of back that accepts 4.25 x 3.375 (image area: 3.75 x 2.875) pack film such as FP-100C or the just-discontinued FP-3000B. The full 4x5 packfilm and sheetfilm that go in the larger 4x5 Polaroid backs are no longer available fresh from anyone.
 
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Pasukaru

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Yes, you can use a Polaroid back on a 4x5 camera, but unless you want to be scrounging for film on eBay, be sure to get the sort of back that accepts 4.25 x 3.375 (image area: 3.75 x 2.875) pack film such as FP-100C or the just-discontinued FP-3000B. The full 4x5 packfilm and sheetfilm that go in the larger 4x5 Polaroid backs are no longer available fresh from anyone.

Perfect! What model should I look? I would like get a good camera...but not a super expensive one, for good I mean solid, not too big , and with all the movemnet that a large format camera can give for enjoy the format and be useful for architectonics pics...
 
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If you want a relatively inexpensive and light 4x5 camera with full movements for architectural photography, I'd suggest a Tachihara field camera (which will cost you about $500-$600), but they're also made by Shen Hao, Wista, and other makers. There are many options out there. If you don't need many movements besides a bit of rise, I'd suggest a Graflex Crown Graphic press camera.
 
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Pasukaru

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yes, there are many models, for this take one is very difficult, the graflex is soo cheap... I m looking around for more information!
 

nikkmeffley

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homemade INSTANT CAMERA FILM..

ANYONE ANYONE?? I SAW A GUY DO IT WITH PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER BUT I WANNA DO IT ON PLASTIC O ITS
 

vdonovan

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The correct back is the Fuji PA-145 or the Polaroid 405. Either will take Fuji Fp-100c instant film and will fit on most view cameras and press cameras.
 

StoneNYC

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The correct back is the Fuji PA-145 or the Polaroid 405. Either will take Fuji Fp-100c instant film and will fit on most view cameras and press cameras.

Or the Fuji PA-45 back or Polaroid 550 backif you want to use the full 4x5 size Fuji/Polaroid pack film.
 

StoneNYC

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Just remember full size film is no longer available.

In America but japan still has it. And eBay had tons, but it certainly is more expensive, then again, more image surface area.

But certainly the PA-145 back and film is easier to come by.
 

mhcfires

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In America but japan still has it. And eBay had tons, but it certainly is more expensive, then again, more image surface area.

But certainly the PA-145 back and film is easier to come by.

I don't know about you, but i don't want to pay fifty bucks for a pack of ten sheets of film that I might not be able to get tomorrow.
 

StoneNYC

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I don't know about you, but i don't want to pay fifty bucks for a pack of ten sheets of film that I might not be able to get tomorrow.

Well, I did (it was only $30 at the time hehe) and it's a lot of fun to shoot, but I'm shifting gears a lot, and getting rid of a lot of my gear to focus on what is most important to me so I just don't need it and won't use it like I used to use it.

I have a PA-145 and PA-45 and getting rid of that one and an extra pack of film, I still have a bunch of the FP-3000B left so I'm holding into the PA-145 for now.
 

unityofsaints

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Yes, you can use a Polaroid back on a 4x5 camera, but unless you want to be scrounging for film on eBay, be sure to get the sort of back that accepts 4.25 x 3.375 (image area: 3.75 x 2.875) pack film such as FP-100C or the just-discontinued FP-3000B. The full 4x5 packfilm and sheetfilm that go in the larger 4x5 Polaroid backs are no longer available fresh from anyone.

At the risk of hijacking this thread a bit, how do people reliably frame shots on 4x5 with this smaller-format film? I'm about 2 packs into my 4x5 instant adventure but I frequently mis-frame: how can I add the right lines to my ground glass?
 
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unity: I made a cardboard template to put over my ground glass. Or you could perhaps mark it off with a china marker or a dry-erase marker. I found that for portraits, putting the person's head right in the middle of the frame seemed to work, but your mileage may vary.
 

StoneNYC

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At the risk of hijacking this thread a bit, how do people reliably frame shots on 4x5 with this smaller-format film? I'm about 2 packs into my 4x5 instant adventure but I frequently mis-frame: how can I add the right lines to my ground glass?

Well, the actual 4x5 version should fit the frame, if you're talking the smaller 3.25x4.25 versions, then remember that the frame is centered horizontally, but then vertically pushed to one edge of the GG (the one you insert the back into) so just remember that and frame from there.
 

1L6E6VHF

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You can play with the film speed and "lighting" selectors to produce odd apertures on the 250.

Of course, there are two aperture settings for each film speed on the 250 (as with the 100, 220, 230, 240, 340 and 350).

These cameras are basically aperture priority automatics.

With 75 (100) speed films, "Bright sun or dull day, also flash" is f/9, but switching to "Bright sun only" gives you f/18.
You can switch the film speed to 150, and turn the ring around the lens two marks toward Lighten. The "..also flash" setting is the same old f/9, but "Bright sun only" becomes more like f/25.
Go to 300, and "....also flash" becomes about f/13 whilst "Bright sun only" is roughly f/35 (At this point, you can't blame the focus. It's the resolution of the print itself as the color dyes sloppily migrate from the negative layer onto the print).

Although one can theoretically use 100 film at the 300 setting by turning the L/D control all the way to "lighten", I would recommend placing a two-stop ND filter over the electric eye (and not the lens) instead, as these cameras tend to underexpose, and it's nice to have the leeway on the L/D control (which, in reality, will change the shutter speed for a given aperture and light level)

With the above cameras, the 3000 film speed settings give you about f/9 for "Indoors without flash" and about f/42 for "Outdoors or flash" (Basically, Polaroid wanted the cameras to be "Hand-holdable" at about LV12, but 75 was too slow and they had to settle for LV13 with the lens wide open).

The 360 and the 400 series cameras have different apertures than above (changes that had to be made because flash exposure is set by distance rather than the automatic shutter, which in reality never worked well with flash in the model100 through 350 cameras)

On Polanoid you can see an outdoor shot I made with the film speed dial at 300 and the lens closed down with about a 1/20th sec exposure in bright sun.

The simpler cameras with only a "color/b&w" of "3000/75" switch give you no such options.
 
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