Please identify Camera [Picasso]

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Telectroscope

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Can anyone (please) identify the camera seen here being used (poorly) by Picasso in 1930.
Screenshot 2023-01-24 at 09.45.25.png
 

Don Heisz

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It looks like a Kodak Brownie - but one that takes a film size bigger than 120. Maybe a number 3?
 

Ian Grant

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Many companies made box cameras, it could also be a falling plate camera, or maybe a 9x12 camera. Try finding a copy of John Richardsons book "Picasso and the camera". It's actually unlikely to be a box camera as Picasso was an accomplished photographer.

Ian
 

Don Heisz

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Many companies made box cameras, it could also be a falling plate camera, or maybe a 9x12 camera. Try finding a copy of John Richardsons book "Picasso and the camera". It's actually unlikely to be a box camera as Picasso was an accomplished photographer.

Ian

Yet he is advancing the film, looking for the number to come up.
 

Helge

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He is looking at the red window. It’s unlikely to be a falling plate camera.
And it’s way too big to be a 120 camera.
Could be a multitude of cameras really.
We need another shot of him using it.
 

xkaes

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It's much more likely to be a camera that was made in Europe than the US -- and there were tons to choose from.
 
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Telectroscope

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It's much more likely to be a camera that was made in Europe than the US -- and there were tons to choose from.
You are probably right, but there is a chance the camera was a gift from Gertrude Stein. Stein took this photo of Picasso using the camera in 1930. She was American. It's all guesses, but not impossible.
 

momus

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I wish someone could identify that cigarette he has between his fingers. It's much bigger than the ones I'm used to seeing, at least in the U.S. Maybe one of those Gauloises or Giatanes? I tried both of those before I quit smoking 12/07/92. If those had been all I could find to smoke, I would have stopped much sooner :-(
 
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Telectroscope

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But didn't Stein and Alice live in Paris for a time?
Absolutely, but perhaps they had supplies from friends and family USA. I agree more likely the camera was made in Europe than the US.
 
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Anon Ymous

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I wish someone could identify that cigarette he has between his fingers. It's much bigger than the ones I'm used to seeing, at least in the U.S. Maybe one of those Gauloises or Giatanes? I tried both of those before I quit smoking 12/07/92. If those had been all I could find to smoke, I would have stopped much sooner :-(

It could be oval shaped and not cylindrical, making it look larger.
 

Don Heisz

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It looks like the film advance winder is at the top of the camera, which is different from the similar-sized Brownie. Agfa cameras had cranks at the top but viewer windows (for the most part) on the left corner (opposite of this camera).
 

Ian Grant

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Yet he is advancing the film, looking for the number to come up.

It looks like the film advance winder is at the top of the camera, which is different from the similar-sized Brownie. Agfa cameras had cranks at the top but viewer windows (for the most part) on the left corner (opposite of this camera).

I have a No2 Brownie next to me, in use with the handle at the top the winder is at the front right as you would be making an image, in the image the camera is tipped forward to see the red window and the numbers.

1674740442972.png



So your first comment is correct, however the finder here is in the same place as my No 2 Brownie, and some other box cameras from other manufacturers. The size is also right for a 6x9 120 box camera.

Ian
 

Don Heisz

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Truthfully, it's difficult to see whether the winder is top or bottom - but in every other way it looks exactly like a Number 3 Brownie - except maybe a bit too long.
The size is too big for a 6x9 120 camera, unless Picasso had the hands of a 2-year-old.
 

JPD

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It takes a larger roll than 120, for postcard-sized prints. Maybe 122-film.
 
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I believe it's a Kodak No. 2a Brownie that takes 116 film. There are several features that match.

The camera opens from the front, and you can see the top latch under his pinky finger.

You can see the shiny buttons holding the handle, the back one is under his cigarette. The handle is in line with the camera.

The viewfinder is rectangular and on the user's right and the aperture tab is in the center. The time exposure tab is not visible, but it is tiny.

The wind knob is at the bottom, note how close his right hand is to his body, versus his left hand at the top of the camera.

It is not a No. 2, as they all load from the back, and not a No. 2c or No. 3 Brownie, as they are much larger. I have a No. 2a and my hand on the top of the camera covers the same area, the pinky finger covering the top latch, and my thumb near the back of the camera.

I have box cameras of that era from Ernemann, Goerz, Zeiss, Ansco, Agfa, Conley and Burke and James. None of them seem similar in detail to the pictured camera. While it is entirely possible that it is another European camera, it would have to match those details.
 
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Goerz Box Tengor?

While they are similar to the Brownie, they have a single latch to open on the right side, the Brownies have chrome latches on both the right side and the top. I believe the spot just below his pinky finger is the top latch. Also, the aperture tab on the Goerz appears to be farther from the front of the camera. The Goerz has its aperture behind the lens, the Kodak has it in front of the lens. Of course, we can't tell from the photo, but the Goerz is made of metal, the Kodak is cardboard.

Picasso camera.jpg



Goerz Tengor.jpg
Goerz Tengor 6.5x11

Brownie 2a
Brownie 2a.jpg
 

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Ian Grant

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I believe it's a Kodak No. 2a Brownie that takes 116 film. There are several features that match.

The camera opens from the front, and you can see the top latch under his pinky finger.

You can see the shiny buttons holding the handle, the back one is under his cigarette. The handle is in line with the camera.

The viewfinder is rectangular and on the user's right and the aperture tab is in the center. The time exposure tab is not visible, but it is tiny.

The wind knob is at the bottom, note how close his right hand is to his body, versus his left hand at the top of the camera.

It is not a No. 2, as they all load from the back, and not a No. 2c or No. 3 Brownie, as they are much larger. I have a No. 2a and my hand on the top of the camera covers the same area, the pinky finger covering the top latch, and my thumb near the back of the camera.

I have box cameras of that era from Ernemann, Goerz, Zeiss, Ansco, Agfa, Conley and Burke and James. None of them seem similar in detail to the pictured camera. While it is entirely possible that it is another European camera, it would have to match those details.

The No 2 Cartridge Hawkeye loads from the front, and was made in Europe and introduced in 1926.

Ian
 

Don Heisz

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While they are similar to the Brownie, they have a single latch to open on the right side, the Brownies have chrome latches on both the right side and the top. I believe the spot just below his pinky finger is the top latch. Also, the aperture tab on the Goerz appears to be farther from the front of the camera. The Goerz has its aperture behind the lens, the Kodak has it in front of the lens. Of course, we can't tell from the photo, but the Goerz is made of metal, the Kodak is cardboard.

View attachment 327707


View attachment 327705 Goerz Tengor 6.5x11

Brownie 2a
View attachment 327706

The viewing window in the Tengor is too close to the edge. The Brownie is a better match.

I have a Rainbow Hawkeye 2a model b that looks like it could be right. It takes 116 film. It still looks too small, but I guess Picasso was probably smaller than me.
 
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