mamiya prism finder model 2

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nwilkins

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Hi there,

I currently use an RB67 with a chimney finder. I am thinking of getting the prism finder model 2 but I notice the magnification is a fair bit lower than the chimney or even the WLF - can anyone who has used the prism finder tell me if it is harder to focus accurately with?

Thanks!
 

jvo

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hmm...

i have mamiya 645's... if there is any similarity, i find the prism finder to be the best for me for accurate focusing for me... old eyes being what they are... (my input in lieu of rb responders!):smile:
 

KennyMark

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While I've never used a chimney finder, I can say I much prefer the newer prism finder to the original. I also have the magnifier attachment that flips up and out of the way for critical focusing.
For eye level shooting (tripod mount and handheld) I believe the prism would be much better than the chimney, but I'm just guessing :tongue:.
 

Alan Klein

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Like Kenny, I have the prism finder with magnifier attachment although frankly get good focus without the magnifier because most of my shots arevstopped down to maximize DOF. The magnifer is more useful when you,re wide open so there is a need for critical focusing.


The main issue is that the prism finder allows eye level view and the scene is not reversed like the waist level and I assume the chimney lens. I just don,t care for reversed images when composing the image. I,ll only use it on very low shots where the prism cannot be viewed.
 
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nwilkins

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thanks guys - I actually like the chimney finder a lot and find it easy for critical focusing. I am getting the prism due to height considerations, though I suspect the non-reversed image will also be a little easier for the rare times I am hand holding the camera. Maybe I should look for a magnifier too, eh?
 

Mainecoonmaniac

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I use a model 2 on my RZ and it makes it easier for me. The big advantage that it makes the images not flipped. The one that I have makes the image look slightly yellow. One thing you'll find that the prism will ad significant weight to your already heavy RB. I'm not using it and I'm willing to sell it to you for a fair price.
 
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nwilkins

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thanks for the offer but I have a line on one already in my city. don't suppose you have a flip up magnifier for it that you'd be willing to part with?
 

paul ron

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I use both the prism n the chimney... I like both for different situations.

The prism is wonderful for focusing, nice n bright as well as everything being right side up n not reversed..... And lets not forget it does change your POV. There is a magnifyer attachment that really increases the image more than the chimeny, your tired eyes just may fall in love with it. The attachment slips on the prism eyepiece slots. It flips up out of the way.
 
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