Lowest hand-held shutter speed for Mamiya 7

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Doc W

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I am going to NYC for a week or so and will not be taking a view camera. Wives, vacations, and view cameras don't mix. In the past, I have used my RB67 in this context but this year, I will be taking a Mamiya 7 and one lens. The lowest hand-held shutter speed I can reliably use on the RB is 1/125 unless I am leaning against or wall or something like that in which case, 1/60 is possible.

I am not really that familiar with RF cameras and their limits. How low can I go? Would a monopod help in low-light situations or are they just extra baggage.?

I can't do my own testing since I just decided to take the Mamiya and I am leaving Friday morning, so suggestions based on experience would be welcome.
 
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Hal Beesley

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With a 7ii I have used 1/15 or lower when braced on something.
 

papagene

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I've used 1/15 sec with a Fuji GSW690 III.
 

awty

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I dont know about the 7, but for slow shutter speeds I will tend to use the timer. That way both hands can concentrate on holding the camera still.......I would still tend to use a timer or plunger when using a mono pod.
 

moto-uno

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^ Next question might be which lens you're taking ? As has been mentioned above if it's the 80 mm
you can get crazy good results at 1/15 if you have something substantial with which to help support yourself . I
don't know if there's anything else close to this in medium format ( and I've tried a few ) . Peter
ps; probably not so great with the 150.
 
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Doc W

Doc W

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^ Next question might be which lens you're taking ? As has been mentioned above if it's the 80 mm
you can get crazy good results at 1/15 if you have something substantial with which to help support yourself . I
don't know if there's anything else close to this in medium format ( and I've tried a few ) . Peter
ps; probably not so great with the 150.

I will be taking only the 80 although I find the 43mm really tempting also.
 

Paul Manuell

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I am going to NYC for a week or so and will not be taking a view camera. Wives, vacations, and view cameras don't mix. In the past, I have used my RB67 in this context but this year, I will be taking a Mamiya 7 and one lens. The lowest hand-held shutter speed I can reliably use on the RB is 1/125 unless I am leaning against or wall or something like that in which case, 1/60 is possible.

I am not really that familiar with RF cameras and their limits. How low can I go? Would a monopod help in low-light situations or are they just extra baggage.?

I can't do my own testing since I just decided to take the Mamiya and I am leaving Friday morning, so suggestions based on experience would be welcome.
You don't say which lens(es) you'll be using. I don't know if the usual reciprocal focal length/shutter speed maxim only applies to 35mm format, but I should imagine that would be a good starting point.

Edit: have just read the rest of the thread and realise you'll be using an 80mm. I suppose with careful bracing, slow exhale and a steady squeeze of the shutter button, 1/15th may be possible. If the results are a bit blurred you could always say they were shot as abstracts using the ICM (intentional camera movement) technique :smile:
 
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guangong

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Despite what the books say, it all depends upon the hands that are doing the hand-holding. Firing a camera is no different than firing a gun. The tighter you try to hold it still, the more camera or gun shake. You can’t muscle cameras, guns or musical instruments. I have successfully shot black/white signs at 1/4 sec with leaf shutter rf camera. Focal plane shutters are more difficult. Extremely slow speeds difficult for SLR without support. Hold your camera the same way as you hold your wife’s hand, fire shutter and don’t worry. You might be surprised by successful slow shutter speeds.
Forgot. Weight of camera plays a role. Harder to hold light flimsy camera steady than one with mass. Never a problem with Kodak Medalist with 100mm lens, my Fuji GF670 is something else.
 
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Doc W

Doc W

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[QUOTE=".. . If the results are a bit blurred you could always say they were shot as abstracts using the ICM (intentional camera movement) technique :smile:[/QUOTE]

OK, now I am covered! :laugh:
 

Pieter12

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I am going to NYC for a week or so and will not be taking a view camera. Wives, vacations, and view cameras don't mix. In the past, I have used my RB67 in this context but this year, I will be taking a Mamiya 7 and one lens. The lowest hand-held shutter speed I can reliably use on the RB is 1/125 unless I am leaning against or wall or something like that in which case, 1/60 is possible.

I am not really that familiar with RF cameras and their limits. How low can I go? Would a monopod help in low-light situations or are they just extra baggage.?

I can't do my own testing since I just decided to take the Mamiya and I am leaving Friday morning, so suggestions based on experience would be welcome.
Keep in mind the cameras you mention handle quite a bit differently. You won't be dealing with a big mirror moving up, and you will be holding the camera to your eye differently. I would think you could easily manage lower speeds than the RB.
 

Mike Bates

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There is no lowest handheld speed for any camera. Some people are steadier than others and everyone has different standards for what constitutes a sharp image.

A simple experiment is sufficient to make the point. Shoot two pictures of a brick wall (flat, easy to focus on with lots of tiny detail) at 1/500 second. Hand hold the camera for the first picture and use a solid tripod w/cable release for the second. Compare the results at high magnification. The tripod photo will be sharper.
 
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