loading 120/220 onto the reel?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by stradibarrius, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    I want to practice loading 120 film onto the reel to be processed. I have some old 220 that I was thinking about using to practice.

    Is there a difference in loading the two? 120 has a paper backing is that correct?
    Will using the 220 give me the practice I need?
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If you've got 120/220 reels that fit a standard tank, like those made by Hewes, and you can load a roll of 220 onto the reel, then 120 will be a snap. Even though it seems like it should be harder to load a 220 reel, I find the Hewes 120/220 reels quicker to load than some of my cheaper standard 120 reels.

    The only difference, aside from the length of the film, is that 120 has a paper backing taped to the film at one end (it will be the end of the film when you're loading it onto the real), while 220 has a paper leader and paper trailer that you'll tear off at the beginning and end of loading.
     
  3. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    As David said, the only difference is the length. Cutting a roll of 220 in half will give you plenty of practice film about the length of 120. When loading SS, I find it easier not to use any of the various little clips on the various SS reels I have. Just hold the film in place with your index finger for (about) the first eight of a turn or so, and the film will hold itself in place, thus minimizing chances of misfeeding.

    I hear all the good things about Hewes reels here on APUG and trust that for most mortals they are superior in their ease of loading. For ham-handed me, I find them (in 35mm) no different than the various SS reels I have accumulated over the years.

    With SS, once you acquire the knack, it goes pretty smoothly. The knack, and how to get it, is a matter of practice. I knew some old lab rats who just could not load SS Nikor reels--which are (were) the best there were at one time. BTW, Nikor was an American company, making and selling SS reels and tanks when Nippon Kogaku was unknown on the American market. Nikor was sold by Burleigh Brooks, Honeywell, among others and had nothing to do with Nikon. FWIW.
     
  4. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    120 has the paper backing. 220 has no paper backing, only a paper leader and trailer, and is twice the length. If you are using the plastic, self loading reels, it's a piece of cake. If you can get the 220 completely onto the reel, you're home free with 120. Steel reels are different. The 120 sized reels will not accomodate the length of the 220 roll. The paper backing is not an issue with 120 film. the film is attached with a single piece of tape, and you must detach the film from the paper backing. With 220 you must remove the trailer and leader papers. Don't worry about the bits of tape that may be left behind. They cause no problems.
     
  5. viridari

    viridari Member

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    With 120, I like to completely unspool the film from the spool first. In doing this the paper backing comes away from the film. When I get to the end of the film, I fold the tape over the end of the film. Then I take fingernail clippers or scissors and make a small notch on the two leading corners of the film to make it much easier to feed into the reel. The corner cutting is strictly optional but it has been a big help for me. Similarly, folding the tape over the end of the film stiffens up the film and also makes it much easier to load onto the reel.

    So it's two major steps for me:
    1) Get the film off of the spool, removing the paper backing in the process.
    2) Load the now-loose film into the reel.

    I've not been doing this for long but this technique works really well for me.