kodak safety film

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pecase

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I have come across some film from what I think is the 50s, but cannot decipher the code. These are transparent color "negatives", (but the colors dont seem reversed), and they are unfortunately cut into images, so not on a loop with notches. They all say Kodak Safety film and have the same 6 digit number on them. What can I find out about them, including if they can be developed? Many thanks for replies.

pecase
 

Bob F.

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If "colors dont seem reversed" - i.e. you can see the images on the film, then they are already developed. If the colours are as they should be (roughly) then they are not negatives, but slides.

What size are they and are they mounted in any kind of holder? Can you scan one and show us which would help identify them, but so far they sound like normal slides.


Bob.
 

jd callow

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just a wa guess

might be faded print film...
 

Dave Parker

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Virtually all Kodak film from the late 40's through the Mid 60's were designated as 'Kodak Safety Film' if you see images on the film, then it has been developed and should be able to be printed by most of the labs/stores around.

How large are they, are they 35mm or Medium format, it was very common to see MF sized film cut into singles from that era, we used to get alot of them that way at the store I worked at.

Dave
 

Mongo

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A quick history lesson: Back in the late 19th century, Cellulose Nitrate was first used as a film base. It had good characteristics for use as a film base (flexibility, easy to coat, held the emulsion well), but it had one significan drawback: It was flammable. As the film aged and decomposed, it became more flammable. Negatives stored in tight spaces (the proverbial "shoe box") tended to decompose more quickly and give off flammable gases. If the film caught on fire, it would give off free oxygen (thus feeding the fire) and toxic fumes. When it was fresh, Cellulose Nitrate film could be ignited by a cigarette. An old box of negatives could be ignited much more easily.

In the 1930's companies started using Cellulose Acetate as a film base. Because it wasn't dangerous like the old Cellulose Nitrate film, it was called "Safety Film." This was a big advertising point in the '40s and '50s, and old film boxes and the film itself is identified as "Safety Film".

Enough of the history lesson for the day...we now return you to your regularly scheduled program...
 
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pecase

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kodak safety film, continued

thanks for your replies, and the detailed history lesson. I guess it makes sense that they are already developed. But i am not sure if they are quite slides, as they are about 2' BY 2". A friend suggested that they are images cut from a film loop. Is that possible? BTW, these are of a famous person!
 
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is there a line next to the images that looks like a 'waveform' or a line from a lie detector test/EKG ? the line would be going along the same place as the sprocket holes, right next to them

if so, its likely movie film.....
 
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