Kodak and Ilford film developer characteristic matrices

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by michael_r, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    I thought I'd post these two reference charts in one place. We often refer to them in discussions about developer characteristics, but can be difficult to find if you don't know where to look. Note the Ilford matrix pre-dates Ilfosol 3, but the reference to Ilfosol S applies. Click on the Ilford info for a slightly enlarged and clearer image.

    Perhaps this can be a sticky or something.

    Kodak:

    Kodak matrix.jpg

    Ilford:

    Ilford matrix.jpg
     
  2. SuzanneR

    SuzanneR Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I've "stickied" this.
     
  3. andrewf

    andrewf Member

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    Funny you should post this as I've just been looking at these charts trying to decide which one is best for me to try next :smile:
     
  4. herb

    herb Subscriber

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    been a long time since I have used it, but I had wonderful results with Rollei 400 and Xtol which I replenished
    been at least 5 years.
     
  5. Jim70

    Jim70 Member

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    Thanks - a useful comparison chart
     
  6. esearing

    esearing Member

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    "Factors such as dilution, agitation, time, temperature, seasoning, replenishment, etc... may give you different results"

    That lists everything you can do so you may never see the shadow detail, grain, and sharpness differences or match their results. They also don't indicate for which films so the chart is basically useless except under tightly controlled lab circumstances with multiple runs to compare consistency. And sharpness will be subjective depending on scene and your camera's/len's light refraction influence. And lets not forget those minute chemicals in the water used to mix your developer which may change the developer properties ever so slightly.

    Pick a developer and get to know it by altering dilution, agitation, time, and temperature until you find that combo that gives you the most control for the film(s) you use. I personally find Pyrocat HD in glycol with a minimal agitation scheme gives me the best results and control over the final outcome assuming all goes well with the initial exposure and metering technique.