jobo film wiper and cascade washer

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by danzyc, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. danzyc

    danzyc Member

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    hello people could i buy this two tool for my darkroom??

    what do you think about?

    thanks
     
  2. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    I use my cascade washer all the time for rollfilm washing. I prefer Photoflo to a film wiper.
     
  3. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    I never use any sort of mechanical wiper on my film. Photoflo works much better and there is no possibility of scratching the film. As for the cascade washer - phooey! A plastic bucket with a few small holes poked through the bottom with a piece of hot wire (think paper clip wire) works just as well and costs nothing. Water goes in on top, comes out on the bottom.
     
  4. Mark V.

    Mark V. Member

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    If you use the original JOBO film drums, the cascade washer is a nice tool for washing your film. The thing can be connected to the JOBO drums.
    I use mine for 20 years now.
    I also use the film stripper. Never had any problems with it and I wiped thoussands of films with it. It is very essential to keep it clean.

    Mark
     
  5. Anon Ymous

    Anon Ymous Member

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    I wouldn't use any film wiper/squeegee. Sooner or later, you'll scratch something. You need to have them super clean and moistened before use. Too much of a hassle IMHO. If you need to speed things up a bit, try wiping your films while hanging between your fingers. You'd better wash your hands and put your fingers in the photoflo solution before doing so. I've tried it (but not with sensitive films like efke!!!) and it worked. On the other hand, I usually don't bother doing it. Of course, that implies that it's a BW film. Photoflo is benign stuff, the stabiliser is something different and I'm not sure I'd like to put my fingers in that. Someone else might know better than me.

    As for the cascade washer... you're opening a can of worms here :D Some people don't even use running water to wash their films. They just fill, agitate and dump. Some have said that this (Ilford) method is an overgeneralisation and it's not ok for all situations. Who knows, that might be true (considering the people who support that opinion). In any case, I think a hose attached to the tap that goes to the bottom of the tank is just fine and *cheap*. You can let water flow slowly and have good results I suppose.

    Just my 2c, as always...
     
  6. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

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    I've had the cascade washer for about 20/24 years, it is a great tool, but it implies that you have ample supply of fresh running water. Whilst it is designed for the Jobo film tanks, it will fit Paterson tanks perfectly. I have both in my darkroom and the cascade washer works equally well on either tank system.

    The trick with the Jobo cascade thing is the little hole in the side, which allows air to be pulled in as the water flows past. This adds turbulence to the wash and effectively massages the film somewhat and also pushes any bubbles sticking to the side of the film away.

    You have to have the water flowing so that the water level inside the transparent nozzle, is between the two red lines. Below that, there is not enough pressure therefore no bubbles, above the lines and you are wasting water and once again no bubbles, or very little bubbles.

    The basics are that with the cascade attached, you should have quite well washed film in approximately 5 minutes of usage.

    It does do what Jobo says it should do, however if you have to pay a premium, I would think twice before purchasing one.

    These days with sparse water in a lot of the planet, inversion washing is what a lot of people appear to be doing. I hand invert myself, instead of using my Jobo cascade attachment.

    Having used squeegees on film in a lithographic environment for many years, then tried to use them on normal photographic film like you will be using, I would suggest using a very good cleaning technique to ensure that the rubber blades are really clean. The slightest bit of foreign matter and you will have scratched film.

    Ilford and Kodak sell wetting agent products that help water sheet off once you hang it up. These products really do help film to dry, water mark free.

    Mick.
     
  7. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    I have used a Cascade for about 30 years - and love it

    I even have a brand new spare - just in case the worst happens

    You need mains tap water to run it - just follow Mick Fagans advice of how to set up the water flow rate

    It works equally as well on Paterson Tanks as it does on the Jobo units

    For me a darkroom must have

    Sorry, I have never used the Jobo Film Wiper - with Film Wipers you either love them or loath them - its a very personal choice - but buy one and try it - you might like it and hopefully will never scratched a film (I haven't yet - touch wood)

    But if funds are short – go for the Cascade first

    Good luck

    Martin