JandC Pro and Efke films?

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Sinarfar

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I was curious to get some feedback on folks using these films sucessfully for continuous tone outdoor work. What films do they most resemble? What exposures and developers seem to work the best? I mainly shoot HP5 and Tri-X in 4x5 (EI = 200). I use HC110 as my staple developer, in dunk tanks.

Any positive or negative experiences? Any recommendations? Cost savings is always attractive. What should I expect?
 

Amund

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Haven`t tried any Efke yet, but I`m very happy with the JandC Pro 100, especially with Pyrocat HD developer. Very good with Rodinal too.

My last post in (there was a url link here which no longer exists) thread has an example of Pro 100/Pyrocat HD
 

Tom Hoskinson

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My primary pictorial film is Efke 100, both in 120 roll and sheet film. I also use J&C Classic Pan 400 (roll and sheet). I develop it all in Pyrocat-HD.

You can see a couple of examples in my personal gallery (APUG). Also take a look at The Contact Printer's Guild (APUG Sponsor).
 

Mongo

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I use both films in 120, 4x5, and 8x10. They're both good films, but I'm hard pressed to say that they resemble anything else. (I might be tempted to say that the J&C has a passing resemblance to TMX100, but it's not really a close match.) They've both got good, smooth tonalities, and are both capable of decent expansion and contraction. I shoot the Efke mostly at ASA50 and develop in Pyrocat-HD (my times are at home and I'm not), and I shoot the J&C at ASA64 for development in both Pyrocat-HD and Rodinal 1:50 depending on my mood. I have yet to find a better combination for 8x10 contact prints on Azo than Efke 100 in Pyrocat-HD 2:2:100.

One thing to be aware of with both: they're both soft emulsion films. Develop them at 68F, skip the stop bath (replace it with four quick water baths), and be especially careful of scratching them when they're wet. The do require a little more "babying" than some films, but I think the results are well worth it.

Even if you're not sure, I'd recommend picking up some of the J&C Pro 100 just to try. I think you'll appreciate the results, and the stuff's so cheap that it's hard to pass up.
 

Flotsam

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I have used R50 (120) and KB100 (35mm) in Rodinal and D-76. I have been very happy with it. Beautiful negs that produce very nice prints. The shadows are full of detail and even my snow scenes hold subtle tone in the broad highlights without special development. I just stocked up on more from JandC.
 

Donald Qualls

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I've shot a few rolls of the J&C Pro 100, though I've only gotten two developed so far. My first roll had the sky areas in three frames marred with bubbles under the emulsion (look like a negative image of a galaxy, almost). I found no emulsion defects at all in the second roll, when I dispensed with the acid stop bath (I had already been developing at 68 F), but that roll was pretty badly scratched (rust in the film path in a camera vintage ca. 1927 -- since carefully removed using methods successful in previous occurrences in other cameras). Some have reported the problems with pinholes and bubbles to be intermittent, so I can't consider my results conclusive yet -- but I have another exposed roll, and 3 more in cameras, plus four more waiting to be used; by the time I've exposed, developed, and viewed all of that film I should know enough to decide whether to make another purchase.

In terms of dev times and reciprocity characteristics, J&C says you can treat it as APX 100, but the soft emulsion makes it obvious it isn't just APX somehow obtained in bulk at a huge discount and recut -- in fact, it's apparently coated specifically for J&C on antique machinery somewhere in China. The backing paper is crude, but effective, and with practice I've gotten better at seeing the (faint white on the black paper) numbers and markings through the ruby window. The film now includes a 120 size film can with each roll, which should cut down mightily on edge fogging after exposure (but still, load and unload in the dimmest conditions possible, the backing isn't as tight in the spool as Kodak). The spools themselves are quite nice, very similar to the one that came (from the Ukraine) in my Moskva-5 when I purchased it -- well molded plastic with a chamfer around the key recesses to ease insertion, and they fit perfectly for both length and key size/profile in a variety of cameras. The film also respools more easily than Kodak for a 620 camera that won't accept a trimmed 120 supply spool.

Imagewise, it's excellent -- after processing for 22 minutes in HC-110 G, agitation every 3 minutes only, grain is almost invisible at 2400 ppi scan (sorry, I don't have my enlarger and bathroom darkroom set up yet), sharpness is excellent, and the film appears to have very good latitude (I get very good recording of textures at Zone II, better than what I'd expect with TMY at the same level of underexposure). J&C claim it takes expansion and contraction well, and stains well, but I haven't tried any of that yet. Maybe I'll do my next roll in Caffenol; the tanning effect might also protect the gelatin a little.

I'd be interested to hear if anyone has success using a hardening pre-bath to reduce the emulsion problems, but I now think the main key will be to avoid the sudden alkaline/acid transition of a stop bath by using a water rinse instead, or going directly to an alkaline or neutral fixer (used one-shot to prevent developer carry over from causing problems).
 

Mongo

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One thing I didn't mention in my post above: both of these films stain beautifully in Pyrocat-HD. I don't use any other staining developer; perhaps someone who does will chime in with their experiences.
 

doughowk

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I'm trying to standardize on Efke films - really like Efke 25 for larger prints (16X20 from 4X5 my current max). Efke 100 gives good tonal range. Just started using Efke 50 in both 4X5 & 2X3. Using J&C 100 in 8X10 while I learn that format (it is amazing how many stupid errors you can make in going to a larger format). These films have forced me to revise my developing routine because of scratching & pin-holes. I now use dip 'n dunk tanks with steel hangers and rodinal at 1:50 for 4X5, & tubes for 8X10. Use TF-4 fixer with water stop bath ( as recently recommended in Jan issue of B&W Photography) to avoid pin-holes.
 

titrisol

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J&C pro 100 is a great value for the money. I developit in Rodinal, and DDX and have great results. The base is clear and a tad of overexposure does it good (I rate it 64 now).
In 120 it tend to curl, but drying it hanging with weight at the bottom has helped.

EFKE 25 and 100 are a couple of really awesome films.
EFKE 25 is the best film I have tried in a long time (reminds me of the old Agfapan25)
EFKE 100 is a true 100 speed, and has quite a wide latitude.

PS. Run a search of the forums we have a few threads about this already:
(there was a url link here which no longer exists)
(there was a url link here which no longer exists)
(there was a url link here which no longer exists)
 
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