Insurance for film...?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by PKM-25, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    I just re-did my film freezer today and aside from the pleasant surprise of it being at -22F, I started thinking about how much dough I have invested in this film. A lot of it is rare and irreplaceable and I thought about how I don't have it insured......:confused:

    I have all my other business equipment like camera gear and computer related items fully insured, but not the celluloid.

    I know some folks around here have large supplies of film and some of you even make a living off of fine art work, so since that is a business, how are you going about insuring film stocks and even chemistry for that matter?
     
  2. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    If you have a policy in force, you can insure the paper and chemicals as stock, since it is a consumable used for your business. I imagine few photographers think to do so.

    Amateurs are okay - film is insured as any other form of personal property in their household. They just have to ensure that their total limits of coverage are adequate.
     
  3. OP
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    PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    This sounds about right, I just hope my insurance company does not freak at the amount..
     
  4. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Member

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    It will depend on what they find to be reasonable for insured limits. I doubt five figures of stock will scare them. I imagine even six figures would be okay, although larger insurers might be required if you're at high six figures.
     
  5. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    Buy an inexpensive indoor/outdoor thermometer, stick the outdoor probe inside the freezer and look at it once or twice a week. It's not like the film will die in a week, like a freezer full of food.
     
  6. OP
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    PKM-25

    PKM-25 Member

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    I have that going, that is not the issue. The issue is I am in a condo and sharing the walls with other tenants, God forbid if disaster like a fire would strike, I want to have this stuff insured to ease the pain..
     
  7. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

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    Then call your broker, and read your policy first.
     
  8. accozzaglia

    accozzaglia Member

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    You could, of course, give your neighbours a heads-up: "If you set this place on fire because you're freebasing or you leave a pizza in the oven for way too long while you're out of the house, I'm not going to scream at you. Instead, I'm going to give you my most precious gift: two 4"x5" cellulose nitrate photos from 1930 that produce vivid colours when you put one in each hand and rub together vigorously. I'll watch you to make sure you do it correctly, and then you can understand why it would hurt to lose all my emulsion stock because of your foolishness. Cellulose nitrate was the predecessor to Kodachrome, but they found with Kodachrome no friction was necessary to get those colours (which last a very long time). Let's just hope it never comes to this, because the downside to this is the colour only lasts for a short while and only shows once. I'd only want to see them under an exceptional situation. Otherwise, I'd rather pass them down through the family. Capisce?"

     
  9. kraker

    kraker Subscriber

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    Alternatively or additionally, why not spread your risks? You're not shooting all your Kodachrome in one day. Store a part of it at someone else's place, someone you trust, friends, family. Buy them a fridge, store some film there. Buy another fridge, store another part of your stock at a third address.

    Or maybe you will just be more worried in that case... :D

    Still, it was just a thought...