Hasselblad question???

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stradibarrius

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I have an opportunity to pick up a 500c/m in LN condition with an 80mm and 150 mm lens. A film back, WL and prism VF's for a good price.

I currently have an RB67 w/ WL, with a 90mm and 127mm lens and a 120 and 220 film back.

I have grown very fond of the 6x7 format and the rotating backs of the RB67. We all know that it is HEAVY but a great camera.
I also have a Yashica 124G that is in pristine condition so I currently have the 6x6 format as well. As you also know this camera is light, portable and takes excellent photos.

I am drawn to the Hasselblad mainly for the faster Zeiss lenses.

If you could have one set up, as described, or the other which would you go for?

I know many will say both but at this point in time I probably cannot keep both systems.
 

david b

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I've never used an RB but own and love my Hasselblad 503cw. Simple and easy to use with great glass. The 80mm is a 2.8 and the 150mm is a 4.0.

What kind of work do you do? If outdoors, then I think the Hasselblad will fit you quite well because it is it lighter than the RB. Keep in mind, some folks, not me, have a hard time with squares and landscapes. I think squares work really well with the landscape if you know how to fill the frame.

Will you have to sell the RB to buy the Hasselblad?
 

Q.G.

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I picked the Hasselblad.
Not because it has faster lenses (has it???), but because it is so much smaller, yet delivers on the same quality level.

The Mamiya is great though, and if you are comfortable with it, why change?
 

Venchka

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I'm no help. I own a Pentax 6x7 with 45/105/150 lenses. I also have a 501cm & 80mm Planar on "long term loan" pending purchase. If push comes to shove, I will sell 35mm rangefinder stuff to fund the Hasselblad. I will keep the Pentax for the faster 150mm lens and STUNNING 45mm lens. Someday I might like to have a 250mm lens for the Hasselblad. Assuming I buy it.
 

Q.G.

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Give it some time.

You mentioned that the main attraction would be the faster Zeiss lenses.
What Zeiss lenses were you thinking of?
 
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stradibarrius

stradibarrius

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Well the 80mm that comes with this camera is the f/2.8 which is faster than either of my Mamiya lenses. The Zeiss 150 is f/4 I think so that is not much different. I guess form I am curious about the reputation that the Zeiss lens have for sharpness and resolution. I have NO experience with Zeiss lenses and only know what I have heard. My Mamiya lenses may be just as sharp and have equal resolution???? That is really why I am asking the question. I thought I would get lots of responses that discussed the pros and cons of the lenses and the 6x7 vs the 6x6 format.
 
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Oh dear, I have a 500C/M and a few lenses which I love, but I have often been tempted to move to the 6x7 format. I don't know why, it's not that the Hasselblad isn't up to the mark, far from it, perhaps it's quite simply that Hasselblad don't do 6 x7!
 

Q.G.

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I guess form I am curious about the reputation that the Zeiss lens have for sharpness and resolution. I have NO experience with Zeiss lenses and only know what I have heard. My Mamiya lenses may be just as sharp and have equal resolution????

The word "superb" is very often used when Zeiss lenses are mentioned.
And though they are not all the same, and some are more superb than others, they indeed are superb.

I by no means know all Mamiya RB/RZ lenses, but the ones i do know are that - superb - too.
And i have no doubt that, with the same "they are not all the same" proviso, the ones i do not know indeed are superb as well.

Some people say that they can tell the difference between images produced by Zeiss and Mamiya RB/RZ glass. And perhaps these 'lens families' each indeed have a unique signature.
But i can't.

My take on this has always been that the lenses of each are more than good enough. Not something to base a decision between the systems on.
So i made my choice based on other considerations.

And i would say that if you are comfortable with the RB, there is no reason to change (except perhaps out of curiosity, to see for yourself).

But that's just my look at things, of course.

David's question is a good one: do you need to sell the RB to try a Hasselblad?
If so, don't.
If not, hang on to your RB and just give the Zeiss thingies a try.
 
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stradibarrius

stradibarrius

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I am an RB lover and I will assure you that it can produce better images than I am able to compose. I really like the 6x7 format and the rotating back on the RB is very nice and makes using the camera much easier.
 

jmartin

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It sounds as though you should probably stay with the RB. If you have an opportunity to try out a Hasselblad before parting with the Mamiya, by all means do so. But if you must let go of one to get the other (untried) system, I wouldn't recommend it.

However, I can say that have both an RB67 and a few different Hasselblads (500C/M, SWC, 500EL/M, 500EL/X). And several different lenses for each system. As Q.G says, the lenses for both systems are all excellent. But these days I use the Hasselblads almost exclusively and the RB very rarely. I simply have come to prefer the square format and the smaller size/lighter weight of the Hasselblad.

But since you do like the 6x7 format (and the rotating back is indeed very nice)... sounds like you already have the right camera.
 

Andrew Moxom

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They are very reliable as long as they have not been abused. Just like ANY camera body. It sounds like you have an opportunity on a mint one. So I say go for it. I've seen some blads in my time that look like they have been world war 3 and are still gonig strong. Long and short of it is make sure the one you get was looked after, and more importantly, CLA'd regularly. That is what keeps most issues at bay. I think the Hasselblad system is truly a thoroughbred camera marque and among the best there is.
 

Q.G.

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They might need minor adjusting every 20 or 30 years to 'keep them regular', but apart from that ...

Using them is more important than periodic CLAs. They need exercise: needing a CLA usually is due to a lack of it.

That is not to say that they never break. Some do, while some don't. You can't use mechanical thingies for half a century without some showing their age.
But there are no 'typical' problems.
 

DanielStone

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OP, you mentioned that you wanted the 'faster' glass from the Hassy, but preferred the 6x7 frame?

look at the Mamiya RZ's. the 110mm(standard lens for the RZ system) is a f/2.8

the RZ stuff isn't as cheap to come by price-wise, but its great quality none the less. A real professional workhorse.

lots of people argue the Mamiya glass is not as good as the Hassy stuff. Absolute Rubbish in my opinion. The Hassy lenses (to me) seem to be a little lower in contrast than the Mamiya glass, but it doesn't bother me much, cause with color I shoot NC films, and usually pull 1/3-2/3 stop in processing. I prefer low contrast.

up to you though.

I had an RB before the RZ. it was a tank. heavy, well-built, and a real worker. I NEVER had a problem with it jamming, or anything breaking.

I can say the same about my RZ. I know there have been 2 owners of it before me, both professionals who shot an assload of film through it. Nothing broken yet, and probably never will be.

-Dan
 
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