Getting Fiber Based Paper Flat

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momus

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Almost one year ago to the day I was trying different methods to get FB paper flat (RC has never been an issue). I still dry FB papers by hanging them at one corner w/ a clothes pin in the bathroom.

You know, it works really well, and the papers have a gentle curve towards the emulsion side w/ no wavy edges. The main thing is to let them dry as slowly as possible. When they're dry, they go under some books and come out flat as the RC papers a few days later.
 

Sirius Glass

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I take the FB and PC papers off my drum dryer and lay them flat to finish drying and cool. Using a drum dryer solves most of the flatness problems.
 

logan2z

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I still dry FB papers by hanging them at one corner w/ a clothes pin in the bathroom.
I assume that leaves a permanent 'dent' in the paper.

Not that this applies to me, but I would think that could be an issue when selling a print.
 

Philippe-Georges

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Almost one year ago to the day I was trying different methods to get FB paper flat (RC has never been an issue). I still dry FB papers by hanging them at one corner w/ a clothes pin in the bathroom.

You know, it works really well, and the papers have a gentle curve towards the emulsion side w/ no wavy edges. The main thing is to let them dry as slowly as possible. When they're dry, they go under some books and come out flat as the RC papers a few days later.
How do you do that?

I tried that hanging method different times with even different FB papers, and never ever achieved 'manageable' results. All the sheets curled, towards the emulsion side, in a way I had to wet them again so at least I could have a look at the images.
 

Bill Burk

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Someone like Bob Carnie might and he dries his fiber prints emulsion side down:


I do it because the prints dry significantly flatter that way and are then much easier to completely flatten in a dry mount press.

I haven't seen any signs of the screen pattern transferring to my prints, but you obviously have and I've heard of other cases in which this has happened too. Maybe as you suggested, it depends on the screen material and how tautly it is stretched, which could affect how much contact there is between the screen and the emulsion during the drying process.

You may have read my complaint before (there’s probably no “others”). As far as I know, I am the only one with bug mesh screens. It just happened to be the material I had on hand when I made them.
 

Philippe-Georges

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You may have read my complaint before (there’s probably no “others”). As far as I know, I am the only one with bug mesh screens. It just happened to be the material I had on hand when I made them.

Polyester bug screens here too, dry the carefully wiped prints emulsion down, no problems at all and the flattest result!
But, I systematically thoroughly clean the screens with warm water and a little bit of an enzyme resolving detergent added to it to get rid of the emulsion's gelatine leftovers...
 

antonio_b

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I ran out of old type gummed paper tape, for holding fiber paper on glass plates for drying. I have to order by some art supplies shop. So I was thinking what alternative could work.

I grabbed a roll of Micropore-like surgical tape. After I press the photo sheet on the glass and wipe the excess water, I dry with a bit of absorbing kitchen paper the glass around the edges.
Works well and in fact it's better than gummed tape: no need to wet it, no risk of liquified gum sneaking around.


fotopapir_micropore_1.jpg


fotopapir_micropore_2.jpg
 

CMoore

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I ran out of old type gummed paper tape, for holding fiber paper on glass plates for drying. I have to order by some art supplies shop. So I was thinking what alternative could work.

I grabbed a roll of Micropore-like surgical tape. After I press the photo sheet on the glass and wipe the excess water, I dry with a bit of absorbing kitchen paper the glass around the edges.
Works well and in fact it's better than gummed tape: no need to wet it, no risk of liquified gum sneaking around.


View attachment 322231

View attachment 322230
On a side not.... :smile:
Can you talk about those photos.?
From days gone by i assume.?
The shot of the building looks nice.!
 

GRHazelton

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Way back in the day my Father and I used a commercial print flattening solution which was diluted with water; the prints got a final brief soak and then were ferrotyped or whatever. The active ingredient of the solution was ethelyne glycol, rather poisonous! But I imagine that propolyne glycol would work as well; it is used to treat wood salad bowls to prevent splitting. Both compounds are hygroscopid, thus they help keep the print from drying so completely that it curls.
 

antonio_b

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Does it work on somewhat larger prints as well

the prints on this picture are 8x10, I don't print larger than 24x30,5 (cm). But I guess there should be no problem, the tape sticks well on the glass (or plexiglass), enough to hold a bigger piece of paper.
 

Paul Verizzo

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Way back in the day my Father and I used a commercial print flattening solution which was diluted with water; the prints got a final brief soak and then were ferrotyped or whatever. The active ingredient of the solution was ethelyne glycol, rather poisonous! But I imagine that propolyne glycol would work as well; it is used to treat wood salad bowls to prevent splitting. Both compounds are hygroscopid, thus they help keep the print from drying so completely that it curls.

Ethylene glycol is just anti-freeze. Yes, toxic in relatively large quantities.
 

GRHazelton

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Ethylene glycol is just anti-freeze. Yes, toxic in relatively large quantities.
My Father, PhD in ChemEng from Michigan, knew that! He commented that one could dip a finger tip in E Glycol and safely note the sweet taste...that taste has killed many pets who found where E Glycol was dumped after changing radiator coolant. I wonder why antifreeze makers haven't switched to P Gycol....cost perhaps?
 

antonio_b

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On a side not.... :smile:
Can you talk about those photos.?
From days gone by i assume.?
The shot of the building looks nice.!

I was visiting few days sister in a small town in France earlier this year, was carrying a 8x10, few film holders and a box of 50 Fomapan 100. It's cheap film and I was taking random shots here and there.
The house pictured there was built in 1548 for Diane de Poitiers, the mistress of king Henri IV of France. It has kept its Renaissance features like the entrance door of the tower, some windows stone framing and other small details.
The place has a story related our own childhood and I lived there as a 4 years old. I had an Apo-Gerogon 240mm in the bag. So i tried to capture most of the house, with sister and nephew posing in front. I could not have more perspective because this is inside a small square, I was standing at the very opposite corner.

I did previous prints on RC, as well as A3 hi-quality injkets from scan, but nothing is like fiber paper...
This is Fomabrom 112 (matte) in Fomatol P (phenidone ascorbate)

a contact print of the 8x10 negative, and, the 2nd sheet is an enlarging of sister and nephews by sneaking into my Opemus 6x6 the bottom of the 8x10 negative , sandwiched between 2 strips I cut in a 3mm plate of glass, for planarity and hold.


8x10_6x6_detail.jpg
 

Paul Verizzo

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My Father, PhD in ChemEng from Michigan, knew that! He commented that one could dip a finger tip in E Glycol and safely note the sweet taste...that taste has killed many pets who found where E Glycol was dumped after changing radiator coolant. I wonder why antifreeze makers haven't switched to P Gycol....cost perhaps?
Indeed. A well known mystery plot, the sweet syrup on ice cream.

The trope about pets lapping it up has been around since forever, not sure if it is a real thing. Speaking as a 60 year amateur mechanic, I can't imagine draining antifreeze and then letting it sit in a puddle. A guy would flush it away with a hose.

I had a sister-in-law who tried to kill herself with antifreeze. She failed, although as best as I can recall, it messed her up enough that she then qualified for disability. Sadly, she met her goal a few years later by hanging herself.

I really don't know about the poly vs ethylene glycol business. Poly is used for winter proofing RV pipes and toilets and in summer homes. The use of ethylene is probably just inertia. Don't forget, antifreeze is a witch's brew of many additives beyond the basic glycol.
 

CMoore

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I was visiting few days sister in a small town in France earlier this year, was carrying a 8x10, few film holders and a box of 50 Fomapan 100. It's cheap film and I was taking random shots here and there.
The house pictured there was built in 1548 for Diane de Poitiers, the mistress of king Henri IV of France. It has kept its Renaissance features like the entrance door of the tower, some windows stone framing and other small details.
The place has a story related our own childhood and I lived there as a 4 years old. I had an Apo-Gerogon 240mm in the bag. So i tried to capture most of the house, with sister and nephew posing in front. I could not have more perspective because this is inside a small square, I was standing at the very opposite corner.

I did previous prints on RC, as well as A3 hi-quality injkets from scan, but nothing is like fiber paper...
This is Fomabrom 112 (matte) in Fomatol P (phenidone ascorbate)

a contact print of the 8x10 negative, and, the 2nd sheet is an enlarging of sister and nephews by sneaking into my Opemus 6x6 the bottom of the 8x10 negative , sandwiched between 2 strips I cut in a 3mm plate of glass, for planarity and hold.


View attachment 322244

Very Interesting
Thank You
 
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