Framing Backing Paper Question

The Handy Man

A
The Handy Man

  • 0
  • 0
  • 35
M3.jpg

A
M3.jpg

  • 1
  • 1
  • 85
Guitar Village

A
Guitar Village

  • 5
  • 1
  • 187
Beach Barista

A
Beach Barista

  • 2
  • 2
  • 276
In the Old Town

A
In the Old Town

  • 3
  • 2
  • 267

Forum statistics

Threads
177,890
Messages
2,442,545
Members
94,346
Latest member
mr_kiwis
Recent bookmarks
0

waffles

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
159
Location
United States
Shooter
Medium Format
I’ve been using IKEA frames to hold my finished work. When I drill holes in the back of the frame for the D-rings, it creates quite a mess of sawdust. I’m thinking about sealing the back of my frames with some kraft paper to keep dust out, and I was wondering in what order you finish the back of the frame.

On the one hand, I was thinking I could glue the kraft paper on first, and then drill the holes through the paper. But I know that this will create a bunch of sawdust and the paper will trap it inside the frame.

On the other hand, I could drill the holes first, and then glue the paper on. But now I have to locate the holes. Which I guess wouldn’t be that hard. I’m just lazy.

What do you do?
 

AgX

Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2007
Messages
28,860
Location
Germany
Shooter
Multi Format
What about drilling holes whilst simultaneously suctioning off dust?
 

amam

Member
Joined
May 11, 2022
Messages
23
Location
tornado
Shooter
Analog
On the one hand, I was thinking I could glue the kraft paper on first, and then drill the holes through the paper. But I know that this will create a bunch of sawdust and the paper will trap it inside the frame.

Seal back with Elmers glue ( or similar white school glue ) add Kraft Paper and drill small holes when glue and paper dry. Do not drill big ones big ones are messy and could damage frame.
 

Roger Thoms

Subscriber
Joined
Nov 18, 2007
Messages
1,411
Location
San Francisc
Shooter
8x10 Format
The vacuum idea is good, as a carpenter who does commercial work we do it the all the time when drilling concrete to minimize exposure to silica dust. Works great.

Another thought is to drill the pilot holes for the screws prior to framing the piece. I've done this and even with backing paper applied to the frame it’s pretty easy to locate the pilot holes. Just rub your thumb over the paper where holes should be and they will show up.

Another method that works on soft to moderately hardwood is to use a sharp awl to make a pilot hole, then there’s no saw dust at all. This works really well on the frames I get from Frame Destinations and I would guess it would work on IKEA frames.

As far as backing paper goes I finally broke down and bought a 3m ATG gun, and a roll of Tyvek for the dust backing on my frames. The Tyvek is much tougher than kraft paper and is acid free. The ATG gun lays down adhesive without the tape. Oh and I also found a nice trimmer for cutting off the excess “backing paper”, it basically an X-Acto knife with a little guide. I’ll see if I can find a link to one.

This is probably better than the trimmer I have. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1201218-REG/logan_graphics_f60_hand_held_dust_cover.html

Roger
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
waffles

waffles

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2017
Messages
159
Location
United States
Shooter
Medium Format
Seal back with Elmers glue ( or similar white school glue ) add Kraft Paper and drill small holes when glue and paper dry. Do not drill big ones big ones are messy and could damage frame.

Maybe it’s just the IKEA frames, but even when I drill a small hole it is super messy. The whole point of kraft paper is to protect against dust. It doesn’t make much sense to introduce sawdust into the equation if we don’t have to.
 

Roger Thoms

Subscriber
Joined
Nov 18, 2007
Messages
1,411
Location
San Francisc
Shooter
8x10 Format
Maybe it’s just the IKEA frames, but even when I drill a small hole it is super messy. The whole point of kraft paper is to protect against dust. It doesn’t make much sense to introduce sawdust into the equation if we don’t have to.

I wonder if the Ikea frames are MDF, that would certainly explain the messy sawdust. Seems best to drill the holes prior to placing the artwork in the frame.

Roger
 

MattKing

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Apr 24, 2005
Messages
38,391
Location
Delta, BC, Canada
Shooter
Multi Format
I'm sure that the IKEA frames I'm using are some sort of composite.
They lack framing hardware (other than extremely impractical inset hooks that I've never figured out a good way to use) so you need to drill pilot holes and add eyelets and wire.
 

momus

Subscriber
Joined
Jun 14, 2009
Messages
4,503
Location
Lower Earth
Shooter
Medium Format
I have no idea what an Ikea frame looks like, or what a D ring is either. But unless your frames are made of a composite that's much tougher than wood, I would just press the hanging eyelet screws into the back of the frame and screw them in by hand. That's how I've done it for 50 years or so, and there's no sawdust. On the contrary ones, I get the pliers to turn the eyelet. Those eyelets are self threading w/ some pressure behind them.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab
Top Bottom