Fiber drying problem

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lightwisps

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Hi everyone, I have a problem with drying my fiber prints. Normally I make 11X14s that end up matted so while I have the wrinkled edge problem with them, it is a moot point because they end up matted so the problem is hidden. To make a long story short, this is a 16X20 that is printed edge to edge and needs to be dry mounted and will be in a frame 16X20 so I have no wiggle room at all at all. But on the opposing edges of on the side of the 20 inch side. I always have just stuck the fiber prints in my dry mount press and flatten them that way, but even with the 11X14 I sometimes get creases in the folds when put under the full pressure. Any ideas of how to get rid of these warpy edges? I have thought about speeding up the speed on the dryer or dampening the edges just a bit. Any ideas of how to get around this problem? Any and all ideas will be greatefully taken into the experimental lab, also known as my hair tearing out lab. Thanks, Don
 

erikg

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So the press isn't large enough for the print? I usually flatten big prints under weight, takes a little time, lots of books etc. Sometimes I've used a press but with very low pressure, just heat. That is for flattening only however. I would not add any moisture anywhere though, could cause a pucker.
 

MartinP

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Trim a couple of mm from the half dry print before pressing it. The edges will be more relaxed and it will reduce the 'hard' wrinkles.

EDIT: Oops, I meant "trim a couple of mm from each edge of". . .
 
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lightwisps

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Thanks, very interesting.

This has been quite a learning experience. Seems so simple yet can drive the sales of beer up in Canada!! Don
 

J.Marks

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I squeegee well, dry face up on plastic screen on my counter, I keep checking them, when dry enough to touch and not stick together when stacked I put the stack under a piece of glass, then a piece of Masonite, same size as glass, a gallon of water on top. the next morning they are extremely flat and ready for mounting.
 

photo buddy

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Try the following soak the print in print flattening solution which is a 5 percent glycerine solution or get two pieces of mat board dry them thoroughly in your press. Next put your dried print between them and put it in the press no pressure just let it sit there and heat up. Gradually close the press and the open it up quickly a few times to let out the residual moisture from the print after this you can close the press and lock it for about 30 seconds, then open it and repeat several times. Do this on each section of the print til you have done it all. You should hane a wrinkle free print.
 

Mainecoonmaniac

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If your dimensions don't exactly have to be 16x20, you can print print lets say 15 3/4 x 19 3/4. Mount the print on a 16x20 board then trim them flush.
 
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lightwisps

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Forgot to say, the prints are on glossy paper but dried face down on the apron.
 

Bob Carnie

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increase the humidity in the mounting room, also dampen the back of the edges with water,,, relax the pressure on the press and increase the heat slightly.
 

ROL

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There's got to be more going on here than you're letting on. Forgetting for a moment all the assistance you've received on not using a press, I've some rudimentary questions for you:

  1. Are your prints becoming creased in processing? In my experience, those injuries to paper and emulsion cannot be repaired. That is breakage, and that goes no further in my DR than the trash can.
  2. Are you using heat with your press? I've never not been able to flatten fiber of any make or size in my Seal 210 (or even under weight alone, given sufficient time). Do it in sections if larger than the press.
  3. You do realize that if you attempt to dry mount a print flush to the edges, that in order to get a clean mount you will have to trim the print and tissue together (or be very proficient and very lucky)?
  4. How will you present a glossy fiber print of equal frame size? Print mashed up against the glazing?
You might want to take a look at this.
Sorry if I've misunderstood you, but like Michael, I don't understand the intent of your posts :confused:.
 

adelorenzo

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When I stick my wavy dried prints under a weight to flatten them I get small creases on the edges of the print. Because they are only in the non-printed border area I let them slide as I have no better way to flatten prints.

This is what the OP is talking about, although he is using a dry mount press. With a border-less print it means that the small creases are in the image.
 

Loren Sattler

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Simple solution…..After drying on fiberglass screens, I put fiber prints in the heated dry mount press for 30 seconds, then stack them under a heavy book for a day or so. This dries them, flattens them while avoiding any creases. They are ready for dry mounting or filing away for future use.
 
Joined
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increase the humidity in the mounting room, also dampen the back of the edges with water,,, relax the pressure on the press and increase the heat slightly.

This will definitely help. I find that higher humidity and longer drying times keep the prints from curling so much.

Also, don't try to flatten prints with really wavy edges in the press or with a lot of weight; you're just asking for creases and wrinkles.

I stack the prints loosely in an old paper box and tape the lid down. Gradually, the waviness becomes less. I add more prints and do the same until I have 30 prints or so in a 50-sheet box. The prints are sufficiently flat by this time to be dry mounted. I tack on the dry-mount tissue and then trim the prints with a rotary trimmer immediately before mounting. Never have a crease or wrinkle.

Best,

Doremus


www.DoremusScudder.com
 

Jonathan R

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I second the heavy sheet of glass method. I air-dry 20x16 prints face-up on screens until touch dry and then place in a neat stack (all face-up) under the glass with a waste print on top of the stack. Place heavy books etc on top and leave it all for a week. For very best results, later leave the selected print on its own (i.e. not in a stack) for a couple of days before mounting.

I have tried the brown tape method too, but found it too much of a faff, and you have to sacrifice a margin.
 
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