Exposure Comp for TLR's?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by bvy, Dec 24, 2017.

  1. bvy

    bvy Subscriber
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    Here's something I read about recently. It seems some Mamiya TLR's have exposure compensation marks for close focusing. I never even considered it for my Yashica Mat 124G (80mm lens) -- the only "serious" TLR I own. For portraits I focus no closer than around 4 to 5 feet.

    But I've only every shot black and white film and metered using Sunny 16. Until recently. I have a backlog of Provia that I've shot in it this year, but I haven't developed any of it. I also used an incident meter for these. Now I'm wondering if I shouldn't ask to have these pushed half a stop or more. Or am I splitting hairs? Plan at the moment is to process just one of the rolls normally and see how it looks...
     
  2. MattKing

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    Four feet is 1200 mm.
    That is 15 times the focal length of your lens.
    You basically don't need to worry about exposure compensation until the distance from camera to subject is less than 8 times the focal length of the lens.
    The lens-extension exposure dial in the Kodak Master Photoguide is your friend :smile:.
     
  3. David Brown

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    No.

    The Mamiya TLRs have exposure comp scales because they have built in bellows. It's only when one cranks the bellows way out for close-up (macro) that the exposure compensation becomes a factor. Rolleis, Autocords, Yashicas, etc. do not focus that close, and so it is not a concern.

    mamiya-c220-professional-tlr-medium-format-camera-c-w-80mm-lens-79.99-[2]-26671-p.jpg
     
  4. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member
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    The extension available with the bellows on a Mamiyaflex is far greater than any other TLR. The normal focusing movement of cameras such as Rollieflex and Yashicamat is so small that any difference is covered by the film latitude - perhaps less than 1/4 stop and that can be incurred with a mal-adjusted meter.
     
  5. etn

    etn Member

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    The Hasselblad Historical site has a very thorough explanation about this. Scroll down to the very bottom of the page for an online exposure compensation calculator. (Although Hassy-centric, the calculator will work for your TLR.)
    http://www.hasselbladhistorical.eu/HT/HTComp.aspx

    In practice, when you focus closer, the film receives a tiny fraction less light. The difference is very minimal unless you reach macro range. As a matter of fact, the inaccuracies of the shutter are much greater than any exposure compensation you will ever need in normal shooting (so to speak). So, no need to worry about anything here.
    Note that an exposure compensation is only needed when doing macro by extending the lens to film distance. No exposure compensation is required if you use a close-up lens.

    Hope this helps :smile:

    Etienne
     
  6. OP
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    bvy

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    Thanks everyone. I worked out the same math as best I could without the camera (I sent it off for CLA), and couldn't justify it either. Seeing the picture of the Mamiya above, I didn't realize it was capable of such close focusing (long draw). Makes sense now.
     
  7. jim10219

    jim10219 Member
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    Yeah, just about every other TLR I've seen focus the lenses using a linked helicoil which moves the internal lens elements, much like your standard SLR or rangefinder camera. The Mamiya TLR's use static lenses that don't focus internally, so you have to focus them by moving the lens board back and forth on a rack connected with bellows, much like on a large format camera. This is also the reason why the Mamiya TLR's are the only ones (that I know of) that have interchangeable lenses. So you gain the ability to switch lenses at the cost of weight, bulk, and bellows compensation worries.
     
  8. Ian Grant

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    Like you I use a Yashicamat a 124, as well as 2 Rolleiflex cameras and a Microcord, We don't have these issues but I used to own a Mamiya C33 and C£ in the 70's early 80's until they were stolen but ideally you needed the Pramender, a device that sat on your tripod, you focussed close with the viewing lens then raised the body so the taking lens was in the position of the viewing lens. I never owned one but used the column on my tripod - I shot a large jewellery catalogue with my C33 this way.

    Ian
     
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