Development of 120 film-Chemicals

Little People

A
Little People

  • 0
  • 0
  • 213
Marseille-9.jpg

A
Marseille-9.jpg

  • 1
  • 2
  • 162
Marseille-16.jpg

A
Marseille-16.jpg

  • 0
  • 1
  • 103
Marseille-6.jpg

A
Marseille-6.jpg

  • 0
  • 0
  • 100

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
180,582
Messages
2,492,639
Members
95,106
Latest member
jgreen
Recent bookmarks
0

Incroyable

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2004
Messages
11
Shooter
Multi Format
Hello,

I am fairly new to developing 120 roll film in a hands on basis. However the darkroom at school that I use has the equipment, chemicals neccessary. I believe they use something from Lauder apparently. The film is Ilford Delta 100.

My question is for the chemical process are the chemicals used for 135 film going to be the same as for the 120 development? I.e. fixer, hypo, etc. Also what about the timing? More or less or perhaps about the same.

Thank you.
 

jim appleyard

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2004
Messages
2,369
Shooter
Multi Format
Chemistry is the same, volume is different and times might be different. Many photographers add as much as 20% to the time.

Try a test roll first!
 

rjr

Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2004
Messages
406
Location
Mosel, SW Ge
Shooter
Medium Format
Morten,

´cause the emulsion isn´t the same and the film bases are different - varying in thickness, in coatings, in reaction to the developers.
 

Ole

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Sep 9, 2002
Messages
9,250
Location
Bergen, Norway
Shooter
Large Format
modafoto said:
Why is the time different with the same film in different formats?

Because there is less need to worry about grain. TF (35mm) negatives are often made to print well on grade 3, MF for grade 1 1/2 to 2.
 

jim appleyard

Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2004
Messages
2,369
Shooter
Multi Format
The times are often, but not *ALWAYS* different. Plus the sprocket holes in 35mm may help to add small currents during agitation.
 

Konical

Subscriber
Joined
Jun 1, 2003
Messages
1,821
Good Morning, Andrewmoodie,

For T-Max 100 (favorite film) and T-Max 400, my processing times are generally the same for 35mm and 120/220. For the same films in 4 x 5, I'll generally reduce the time by 10% to 20% (for "normal" development) but only because I use a drum and the agitation is continuous. The other posting above are also correct to note that there can be slight changes in time with some films; checking the film data sheet is a good idea, at least as a starting point.

Konical
 

Tom Hoskinson

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2004
Messages
3,874
Location
Southern Cal
Shooter
Multi Format
I agree with Konical and would add that development times should be viewed as starting points. You should always expect to do some testing in order to tune the development process for your film, chemistry, equipment, end use (printing, projection, scanning, etc.) and personal preferences.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab
Top Bottom