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Nicole

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I'm still trying to get my head around why I would use various developing agents and for what purposes. So if you can help me by answering some questions (and maybe adding a couple of your own) I'd really appreciate it.

What subjects to you normally shoot?

What film do you use and why?

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

What developing agents do you use and why?

Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

Thanks everyone.
Cheers
Nicole
 

Maine-iac

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Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
I'm still trying to get my head around why I would use various developing agents and for what purposes. So if you can help me by answering some questions (and maybe adding a couple of your own) I'd really appreciate it.

What subjects to you normally shoot?

What film do you use and why?

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

What developing agents do you use and why?

Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

Thanks everyone.
Cheers
Nicole


I have experimented with many developers and have standardized on the ones that give me the combination of
* fine grain (I almost never like a grainy print)
* smooth full tonal scale with delicate highlights and good blacks in the shadows
* ease and convenience of use
* simple, non-toxic, easily available ingredients (Phenidone is the only one I have to buy from chemical suppliers; all others are from the pharmacy, health food store, or the supermarket.)

I have standardized (more or less) on five films (Fuji ACROS; Fuji Neopan; Delta 400; FP4+, and HP5+)

My PCM and PCC formulas posted in my response to your question about Tri-X in D-76 or Rodinal meet all the above criteria. So I've stopped experimenting with new film developers. I'm happy with what I'm getting.

Larry
 

titrisol

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1. What subjects to you normally shoot?
Depends on the mood, but lately a lot of pictures of my 2 daughters, both outdorrs and indoors

2. What film do you use and why?
APX 100 and EFKE 100 normally, becuase they are good and I buy in bulk
NEOPAN 400 and DELTA 3200 in my bag for the just-in-case subjects
EFKE 25, for outdoors, or things I'd like to have highest quality
JC PRO 100 for old-classics
OTHER films, as available (read - on sale)

3. Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?
Generally stick with what I;m bulk-loading

4. What developing agents do you use and why?
Rodinal (p-aminophenol) because it gives a great look and it's economical and convenient
DDX - PQ developer? convenient, and gives great graing, excellent sharpness and tonality
Diafine (when i decide to mix some) no words to desribe this

5. Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?
Rodinal for 25 and 100 films
DDX for the rest ----- When I use DDX I make a "long" development session, I try to develop 5 or 6 rolls using the same solution for economy, so I may soup all sorts of film.
Coffee when I'm in the mood for experimenting/having fun
Diafine, whenever I mix some.... for everyhting

6. Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?
Not that I'm aware of
 

Lee Shively

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I'm a generalist. I'm too fickle to specialize in one subject. Looking at my photos, I can't see any real categorization.

I've used Ilford HP5+ and PanF+ almost exclusively for nearly three years. PanF+ in medium format, HP5+ in 35mm and medium format. I like the tonalities of HP5+ over Tri-X. HP5+ looks like Tri-X shot through a #8 yellow filter. PanF+ just because I fell in love with it 30 years ago (before it was "+") and I still love the creamy tones.

I've used D76 1:1 and 1:3 mostly. I just started trying Mircodol-X 1:1 with PanF+ and may switch to it. I also just tried Rodinal/sulfite with HP5+ and want to explore this a little more. D76 is hard to beat, however.

I haven't switched developers according to light or subject. I've stuck with D76 exclusively until recently. I may do some adjustments but it's too early to tell.

I don't think developers, at least none of the developers I've ever used, affects the archival properties of film.

My opinion, for what it's worth, is it is best to settle on one or two films that give you the properties you like and then settle on a standard developer for each. I like simplicity. Life is too damn complicated as it is.
 

mark

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Decide through trial and error what is good for you and how you are comfortable. Since you are just starting out I would definately get used to the process first with one film and one developer. That way you concentrate on your developing technique and getting to know that one combination. When you need to move to another you will know. Assess what you like about your combination and what you do not like. That will tell you where to go next. There will be as many answers here as there are people. SO I'll just chuck in my $.02US

Landscape or my son

BW-Efke Pl100 and JandC classic 200, Delta 100
Color-Provia 100F and Velvia 50

Development I have decided to stick with Pyrocat-HD because of the stain. I hate grain so refuse to use fast films. Classic 200 is the fastest I will go and I only contact that. The staining developer seems to hide a lot of the grain that is in the slow films.

I believe in making life easy on my self. I will use one box of film until it is finished and then get another out of the freezer. With 120 I have a little more freedom but I only shoot delta 100 in my MF camera when shooting BW. It is fool proof and Tri-X sux the big one in my view. Unless of course someone gives me some free film I figure why fight things when I am perfectly happy with delta.

As for developers I go with ease as well. one developer that suits my needs is all I use. If I want to start trying a new one I do so after the old one is gone. With a small child in the house I want as little chemicals around as possible.
 

johnnywalker

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I'm not much further ahead on this than you are. I started out using DDX and either Delta 100 or 400. Now I've started experimenting. I've added HP5+ and FP4+ and I use ID-11 for normal photos, perceptol if I "pull" anything, and microphen if I "push". DDX is great, but I've decided to get away from liquid developers in case I have to start making my own someday.
To be very honest I'm not sure my experiment is an improvement, but it is certainly as good.
 

panchromatic

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What subjects to you normally shoot?
-Looking at all the pictures on my wall i can say I shoot in three catogorizes: still life, urban/industral landscapes, and portrait/landscapes with portraits

What film do you use and why?
-I fell in love with fuji acros and neopan 400, but have been experimenting with delta 100, and delta 400 lately.

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?
-Mostly I keep speed in mind and where I will be shooting, though I know if I'm doing portraits then I will shoot fuji acros, or something fine grained.

What developing agents do you use and why?
-I've always used tmax or d76 (of course in high school and college they force feed this) but I just bought my first bottle of rodinal and plan on experimenting with it soon.


does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?
-I haven't the foggiest
 

arigram

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I think I have all the information of my methods around these Forums Nicole, but here is a sum.

>What subjects to you normally shoot?
People and cityscapes.

>What film do you use and why?
PanF+ my slow, tripod film of choice.
FP4+, either rated at 64 or 125, tripod or handheld depending on the light. I like its versatillity and image quallity.
TriX 320 for my handheld people shots. I like the look of it on people.
(I have also used HP5+ -extensively-, TMax and the Deltas - Delta 3200 is great in special circuimstances)

>Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to >subject/conditions?
Yes, I varry according to the light conditions, subject matter and end result aesthetics.

>What developing agents do you use and why?
Mostly D-76, but lately I've learned to use Rodinal, Ilfosol-S and Perceptol.
I use them mostly because its the ones I can find around here, plus they give me almost everything I need.

>Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly >to film/subject?
I use Rodinal with PanF+ (for sharpness) and TriX (great look), D-76 for TriX and as "normal" developer of other films, but lately I re-discovered Ilfosol-S and Perceptol. Perceptol is great when I want smooth tonallity and I might use it for PanF+ up to FP4+. Ilfosol-S which at first did not take seriously is a wonderful all-around developer.
When it comes to sharpness-grain and smoothness-grainless I think of these developers like that:

Sharpness-grain <-> Smoothness-grainless

Rodinal, D-76, Ilfosol-S, Perceptol

>Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? >If so, how?
I don't think so. If you fix and wash them properly, the developer shouldn't have any effect on the archivabillity of the negatives.
 

John Bartley

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From an amateur ::

>> What subjects to you normally shoot?

- countryscapes and still life in nature.

>> What film do you use and why?

- FP4+ and HP5+, why? - available locally

>> Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

- Until I have more experience and wish to experiment with different results, I'm going to stick with what I know works for me

>> What developing agents do you use and why?

- Rodinal and home-brew D-D23, why? - Rodinal is from the same store as my film and it works - D-D23 I create from dry chemical so it travels well without freezing when we head North to our remote retreat and it's easily mixed and disposed of.

>> Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

- I use Rodinal for "normal" exposures and D-D23 when I know that I have highlights that I don't want all whited out.

>> Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

- I don't know.

cheers
 

VoidoidRamone

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1) I normally shoot urban landscapes, industrial landscapes, and environmental portraits.
2) APX100, Pan F+, and HP5+ for b&w. Fuji NPS160 for colour. I really like the look of APX100 and PanF+, they have a great tonal range and I have gotten used to them. HP5+ because it is a good fast film and I like it more (and it's cheaper) than Tri-X. Fuji NPS160 is the only colour neg. film that I've shot a decent amount of...
3) I generally have a few rolls of all those films stated and usually more APX100 since that's my favorite film and I've gotten used to it.
4) I mainly use rodinal because it has a great look and it's cheap. I also use WD2D+ and HC-110 (mainly for the faster films to help with grain).
5) I've been using Rodinal for a while and have used more of that than anything else (I like it a lot). I started out using HC-110 and HP5+ combo, and I've always liked that. WD2D+ was/is the first pyro developer I tried, and I'm very pleased with it (really nice tones).
6) I don't think so/know...
-Grant
 

rbarker

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What subjects to you normally shoot?

Almost everything - landscapes, portraits, nudes, editorial fashion, products, etc. But, not much "street" - I'm not bold enough. :wink:

What film do you use and why?

For B&W, I use mostly Ilford FP4+, sometimes Pan F+ for MF and 35mm when I need even finer grain. For 8x10 I use mostly Ilford HP5+, making only contact prints. Occasionally, I'll use Ilford Delta 3200 when I want additional grain, or Delta 100 or Fuji Acros if I want a crisp, "technical" look. Color is mostly Fuji - Provia or Astia for chromes, NPS160 for color negs.

For most subjects, I prefer relatively fine-grained film, and prefer the softer, creamier (or, insert your favorite adjective) look of traditional emulsions over the modern T-grained films.

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

I vary the film based on subject/conditions, as noted above.

What developing agents do you use and why?

I'm kind of lazy. Rather than spend a lot of time testing, I prefer to use a limited set of developers that produce the look I want, mostly using a single "standard" developer. For me, that's Ilford DD-X, which I feel produces the balance between tone, fine grain and accutance that I'm looking for. (Apologies to Morten and the CoR. :wink: )

Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

With developers, I'm more of a sticker than a varier. I like the simplicity of a single developer that gives me the look I want, and the convenience of a liquid concentrate like DD-X.

Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

While I could easily be wrong, I don't think so - at least not with conventional developers. Archival quality, to my thinking, is more a matter of proper fixing and washing.
 

Clueless

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There are those that are "experimenters" some of whom may be looking for the greener grass that will add "something" to their lives. Others may think of the intended output and try to match materials and equipment that will contribute to the congruent sense of that final output (print). It seems some are great compromisers that economize. As a metaphor take a stereo-typic man's love considerations to his sister, mother, daughter, street walker, magazine fold-out, grandmother, cheer-leader, in terms of how he'd present an image in terms of paper, range of tones, base color, sharpness, grain, -those and other factors contribute to the success of communication of his intent. So any thing that helps move in the direction of your intent is what counts -not what someone else uses -unless your intent is the same.
 

BWGirl

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Good thread, Nicole! I am sure I have zero answers...cripe, half the time I don't even know enough to ask the questions!

I know I should do some testing with films & developers and even with different methods of agitation...but I just have a tough time with that much precision. :wink:

I don't really use film faster than 125 (FP4+) and I love being able to re-define the film speed. It's one of the things that attracts me to B&W. I use several different films because I still don't know which ones I like. I use Ilford PanF+50, and FP4+. I use APX100, and Fuji Acros 100. I really like all of them. About the only film I am unhappy with so far is Delta 100. It's been a really trying film for me. :sad: I've 'tried' it @ 50...I've 'tried' it @ 100...I've 'tried' it in this developer...in that developer... you get the picture.

I like taking photos of landscape & 'stuff'... like barns, old dilapidated things, waterfalls, water in general, snowscapes (so much opportunity :wink: ). The films I use are really suited for the things I like to shoot... with a tripod, without a tripod.

I have just recently started switching films to suit the 'environment'. If I'm shooting waterfalls or running water, I will probably use a slow film (PanF+ 50) or slow down a film. Same if it's really sunny, or if it's even a wee bit sunny, but there's snow covering every last square inch of ground (oops...little spring fever here). But I am still learning about my films so I really don't have a solid 'relationship' with them yet.

I use Rodinal...I used to use Ilfosol S, but the stuff goes south so fast that I can't get my money out of it. I did my first films in D 76 cause that's what they had at school. But I like Rodinal. Is it the 'best' developer??? I have no clue, but I like it!

As to archivability... I would think that the fixer would be more pertinent to archivability... but that's just my thought. :wink:
 

scootermm

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Nicole.
I cant do the whole multiple developer thing. Financially, and because of the confusion it causes me.

What subjects to you normally shoot?
in 8x10
I shoot alot of old buildings, abandoned places. Im as in love with overcast dreary days as I am with beautiful blue sky days.
in 35mm, medium format
lots of concerts in really low light using fast cheap lenses. sometimes I like to walk around the city and just take photos of anything and everything.

What film do you use and why? Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?
8x10
Ultrafine 125. Basically Im used to the film and have been very pleased with the quality and also LOVE the price. I stick to this film in 8x10 almost exclusively. Im used to the developing times and am becoming more and more accustomed to the results and the correct way to expose it.

35mm and MF
Ilford 3200, TriX, HP5, PanF. depending on the lighting conditions. If I know the light conditions will be diverse Ill use the TriX or HP5 because of how forgiving they are. I recently illustrated an 8 page article on a soldier that was badly wounded in Iraq and recovering here in Central Texas. I shot the interview with my canon 35mm, a 50mm f1.8 lens and some triX I shot the whole thing in manual mode and the exposures were all over the place. Yet I developed the roll at the median of about 800iso and got resulting gorgeous negatives that fit the copy and the piece wonderfully. Even some of them are full two page images and the images are sharp with noticeable grain... but that was what was desired.
The Ilford 3200 is wonderful for low light concerts and the like. Ive successfully pushed it +2stops and enjoyed the results. Also liked the results of it being shot at 1600 and developed normally.
I also love PanF for landscapes/architectural work.
The TriX and HP5 is wonderful for day to day shooting and city stuff.


What developing agents do you use and why? Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?
I use Pyrocat HD 1:1:100 for 8x10 and 4x5. I brush develope with development by inspection method. Minimizes scratches and creates the most even development.
I use rodinal with all my medium format and 35mm film. almost exclusively at 1:50 or 1:25 if Im in a rush :smile:))

Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?
Not that I know of.

I hope that helps. Im by no means an expert and likely theres alot of more tech savy gents/ladies on here that can give more info.
 
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1. What subjects to you normally shoot?
Normally a lot of closeup work in nature, but lately I've been trying some expansive landscapes as well.

2. What film do you use and why?
I love to use APX100 and Efke25 because of their tonality and consistency. Unfortunately I can't afford Efke25 in sheet film even though it's cheap and APX100 isn't available, so I found a source of fresh FP4+ in 4x5 for 46c/sheet which is excellent value for a very good film.

3. Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?
I try to be consistent, especially with roll film, so the Efke and Agfa just receives different development times depending on the look I want. Sheet film is developed by inspection, so it is less critical which film I use, but I try to stick with FP4+ unless I find some cheap film to experiment with.

4. What developing agents do you use and why?
I used Rodinal exclusively because it's reliable, cheap, available, and it gives tremendous consistency being a one shot developer. I love the sharpness it provides. Lately I've been trying the Fine Art Photo Supply FA-27 developer, but am still forming my opinion about it.

5. Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?
Like I said, I use Rodinal almost exclusively. It works so well with both Efke, Agfa, and the FP4.

6. Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?
I don't know. In my mind it's mostly the fixing and washing process that would be of importance. I don't know for sure, but it would seem appropriate that all of the developer remaining on/in the film emulsion would be washed out by stop bath (water), fixer, wash, hypo clearing agent, and another wash.

I'd like to add that I use slower speed films because I'm almost always on a tripod, except for the odd roll of 35mm. My subjects are in no hurry to run away (trees, grasses, rocks and so on), so I can use longer shutter speeds without a problem.

Hope that helps, and doesn't confuse.

- Thom
 

Soeren

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1)
I shoot nature, land- and cityscapes, details/closeups a bit people and a bit bit nudes.

2)
In 35mm I shoot FP4+ and Fuji Neopan 400 Which I really like. I've done some HP5+ but I think Ill stick with the Neopan. I've tried the 1600 and will propably use it again.
In MF it's still The FP4+ and I think of it as a very good film in both formats. I do have the HP5+ and delta 400 (120) in my freezer but I havn't done much with 400 ISO film in MF yet.
I'd like to try some slow films e.g. Pan F and Efke 25.

3)
The mood I'm in :smile: I havn't thought about that. I do like to try new stuff once in a while. If I'm out of the one I use the other.

4)
I develop in Rodinal, originally because of the shelftime and some anarkism but I found that I like the results with FP4+ and especially Neopan 400, it really surprised me here.

5)
Don't know yet, that is, yes for the time being. I have tried D-76 and Xtol but somehow they lacked that certain something. I don't know yet if FX2 and DDX will work for me.
I'm looking forward to get to mix some FX2 for which I have had the chemicals for some time now. Furthermore I'm thinking of getting some DDX for the fast films just for the fun of it, see how it looks.

6)
The fixing and the washing is what matters. see Thom's comment.

Regards Søren
 

modafoto

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Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What subjects to you normally shoot?

Mostly people (anything from kids and portraits over heavy metal bands to fetish and S/M). Besides that, it is forests, macro stuff and still life.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What film do you use and why?

For black and white it is mainly Delta 100, Pan F+ and Tri-X. Colour is mainly Fuji Sensia 100 (slide film) and Fuji Superia 400 (colour negative)

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

Yes. For studio shots with black and white I use Delta 100 and Pan F+. Most mostly Delta 100. For indoor available-light and outdoor stuff where I need much freedom and wants to shoot handheld exclusively I use Tri-X rated from 200 to 1600.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What developing agents do you use and why?

Suprisingly Rodinal is one of my favourites. Besides that I use Rodinal Special, T-Max and HC-110.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

Depends on how much grain I want. Sometimes I want a smoother result than Rodinal gives me. But mostly I am interested in the Rodinal look.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

Interesting question. I am not able to give you an exact answer. But I know than there are some products that will extend the life of the neg. Agfa Sistan is a silver stabiliser.
 

c6h6o3

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Gosh, all these choices make my head spin. I'm way too simple-minded to be allowed to play with so many dangerous chemicals.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What subjects to you normally shoot?

Landscapes, architectural interiors, portraits (not as often as the first two)

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What film do you use and why?

I use 400TMax in 120, 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 formats because the negatives I make from it yield the most beautiful prints.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

Occasionally I'll use Efke R50 for indoor portraits with strobe lighting because of the beautiful skin tones I can get with it. Not very often, though. Other than that I use only 400TMax.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
What developing agents do you use and why?

I use Harold Harvey's Panthermic 777 film developer because the negatives I make with it yield the most consistently beautiful prints. I use Michael A. Smith's amidol based paper developer because it too yields the most beautiful prints of all the developers I've tried.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

I never vary them.

Nicole Boenig-McGrade said:
Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

I have no idea, but I'm not concerned about it since I'm convinced that the negatives will last a whole lot longer than I will. I'm only really concerned about the archivability of the prints.
 

jim appleyard

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Nicole, have you considered taking a b/w course? Many community colleges offer them or sometimes a local arts center will. You will get lots of good info here from very knowledgable people, but we can't **SHOW** you how to do things.

Look into it; see if a class is available.
 

erickson

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What subjects to you normally shoot?

I shoot landscapes and urban night landscapes. I shoot weddings and portraits for friends and family.

What film do you use and why?

Ilford PanF+ has the fine grain and tonal scale I like for landscape subjects. Ilford FP4+ is a great general purpose film. I use a heavy tripod and cable release when possible and have no need for high speed films.

My outdoor wedding and portrait color film is Kodak Portra 160 NC which is processed and printed at a local pro lab.

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

I use the PanF+ for landscapes. FP4+ gives lower contrast for night scenes and more flattering grain for people subjects. I don't know much about color film, so I stick with what I know (Portra 160 NC).

What developing agents do you use and why?

Ilford Perceptol (1+0) develops everything I shoot in B&W. I have been using Kodak Microdol-X (1+0) due to a shortage of Perceptol. It seems as though Ilford may bring back their discontinued chemicals (including Perceptol) soon.

Do you generally stick to the same developing agents or vary accordingly to film/subject?

I always use Perceptol (or Microdol-X). The only things I vary are exposure and development times to control contrast.

Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?

My oldest self-processed negatives are only about 10 years old. So far, there have been no archival problems. Even my "not sure I did this right" negatives from 10 years ago (HP5+ in Ilforsol-S or D-76 back then) still look normal. I store negatives using Print-File negative sleeves.
 

arigram

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I am really serious when I say this that Sean should make this thread a sticky and all APUGers should be invited to contribute. Instead of having threads about film and developers popping out again and again, this would be a great treasure chest of information!

Nice going Nicole!
 

rbarker

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arigram said:
. . . Nice going Nicole!

I agree. Nicole has a knack for coming up with great "survey" questions.
 

Bob F.

Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Messages
3,978
Location
London
Shooter
Multi Format
What subjects to you normally shoot?
Landscape, buildings, anything that does not move....

What film do you use and why?
Various (still experimenting) but take FP4+ in ID-11 and Delta 400 in ID-11 as my baseline.

Do you generally stick to the same film or vary according to subject/conditions?

Generally stick with FP4+ but switch to Delta 400 for handheld. Have started experimenting with 120 Maco 820c infrared.

What developing agents do you use and why?
ID-11 is my baseline but I also use Rodinal quite often plus experiment with others, as the whim takes me....

Does various types of developing affect the archivability of the negatives? If so, how?
My understanding is that sufficient fixing and subsequent washing defines negative lifetime. I follow fairly established practice for these - 3 times the clearing time for fix (I chuck the fix when the clearing time becomes 50% more than with fresh) and use Ilford's washing cycle (plus a couple of extra wash cycles for safety's sake).

Bob.
 

JohnArs

Subscriber
Joined
Sep 20, 2002
Messages
1,074
Location
Switzerland
Shooter
Multi Format
Hi Nicole

I do almost photograph everything from portraits, fashion, cityscapes, landscapes and architectures, nudes, stillives, people and ads.
In 35mm I use mostly all Ilford products but after the troubles with Ilford I started also with Fuji Acros. MF is the same.
LF in 4x5 and 8x10 additionally to the Ilfords also TMX100 and 400.
But if I would get the Delta 100 and 400 in 8x10 and 4x5 then it would be again only Ilford.
In color I work most with the yellow ones but on the slide part also with the Astia and Provia F. But work more and more with negs then with chromes because of the larger range.
I worked in the past for a very long time with Tetenal Ultrafine for B/W developing, used then some Ilford products and after the largest B/W test in german lab mag some years ago they tested about 50 developers and XTOL was the winner and since then I only use the winner with all my B/W negs.
I'm not a testing guru at all and I will stick with it as long as I get it.
My teacher learned me not to change to often and know your materials.
For the archival part I use always fresh fix and test it from time to time if it is still fine and the almost exhaust fix get the stop part. So I have a 2 bath fix. And then I wash it very long for about 10 minutes then the nags go into Kodak Hypo Clearing Agent for a minute and then again 10-15 minutes washing. Then 1 minute into Photo Flo and the try in the air!
My nags are 20 years the oldest and still locking perfect.
Wich you all nice Easter!
 
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