Developing at high temperatures

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by BetterSense, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    Kodak provides development times all the way out to 25C, with a warning that times shorter than 5min can be inconsistent. I have a 5gal container of DI water in my darkcloset, and my D76 lives there too. Since it's on the far corner of the house, and I tend to keep the door closed to keep dust down, the temperature sometimes goes right up to 25C. The times are still about 9 minutes for Tmax, but would there be any benefit to moving my chemicals to a cooler place?
     
  2. trexx

    trexx Member

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    On some films the emulsion get too soft at higher temperatures, like 30C . But in general souping at higher temperatures is not an issue. 25C is not a too high for any film I have used. You can develop at much higher temperatures but times can get too short. The other caution is if the film is much higher then room temp. reticulation can occur. Happened to me with E-6 in a cold darkroom.
     
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    BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

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    What is reticulation?

    I was wondering if thet high temperatures have anything to do with my cupped TMAX negatives.
     
  4. mwdake

    mwdake Member
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    During the summer my tap water comes out at 25c.
    So rather than try bring it down and maintain it lower I just process all my film at this temperature.
    Seeing as I like to use dilute developers anyhow, this ends up making the times much shoter but not too short.

    I can't say I have ever had any problems developing my films at 25 c.
     
  5. Aurum

    Aurum Member

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    Best way I can describe it is a crackle finish on your negatives. The emulsion develops hairline cracks and the pieces can distort effecting the image quality.

    Can look interesting if you want special effects. Its caused by abrupt temperature changes when changing solutions. For instance presoaking with water at 40 then adding dev at 20 can provoke it, or developing at say 40 then rinsing the film with cold water from the tap at 15 degrees.

    With modern film such as TMAX you really have to provoke the effect to get it. Old style film emulsions such as those made by Efke or Adox are softer and can be more prone

    You can find an example Here

    The method here was to put a 4x5 sheet negative in the freezer to dry. Thats what I call provocation
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 9, 2009
  6. CBG

    CBG Member

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    Google found this image of reticulation. Dead Link Removed

    Reticulation is caused by fast large changes in solution temperature causing a wrinkling of the emulsion. Worst, I believe, is sudden drop of solution temperature.
     
  7. phritz phantom

    phritz phantom Member

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    for quite some time i've been wondering if a higher temperatur (and therefor a more active developer) has any effect on the film sensitivity and iso-rating and if this could be used for push-processing. like for example the xr-1 developer, which is supposed to be used at 30°c (86 F).
    anyone ever did any testing for that or any chemists with some info?
     
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