Depth of field problem (camera related)

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Hi all,

I am working with my first ever sheet film camera, and it's a Crown Graphic. Now that I am learning more, I would like to be able to control depth of field a little more, using the schweimpflug principle, where the front lens element is tilted forward. This movement is not available on the Crown Graphic, it tilts backwards, and has front rise, and that's it.
The only thing I can do is hang the camera upside down, but that will cause severe unstability, and problems setting up.
I am afraid I will have to purchase another camera, and would like some hints on a light, but rigid field camera (4x5) that has the movement I desire, and that doesn't cost too much. I can use the Kodak lens that's on the Crown, it's good enough for my work.
I don't need a bazillion movements, I actually try to stay away from it as much as I can, as it is my belief it will make the camera less rigid.

Anyway, any help appreciated.

- Thomas
 

BradS

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Here's the trick that I use.

Depending on the focal length of your lens you may want to run the rack out a few inches first so that the back part of the rack comes all the way out of the 'box'. Then....

Drop the bed and raise the front...now your lens is tilted forward. You can tilt it back slightly to achieve the desired effect.
 

David A. Goldfarb

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Lots of info on various cameras at lfphoto.info.

Meanwhile, on the Crown, I think you can tilt the camera bed down, raise the front standard, and tilt the standard back to adjust, as a way of getting a little tilt.

Most flexible new wooden camera for the money is probably the Shen-Hao, though it isn't the lightest.
 

Nick Zentena

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Which Kodak lens? If it's the 127mm then it might not have much extra coverage when you try to use any movements.

Used many monorails are cheap but kind of heavy and bulky.

If you only want front movements then the B&J press camera might be good enough for you. It's usually cheaper then your crown. Downside is the spring back.

http://members.lycos.co.uk/jolommencam/Burke/index.html


This site provides a link to a manual for the camera.

http://zeropoint.six-something.org/v04/index.php?equipment=3


OTOH you might end up buying a bunch of cameras looking for the perfect one. Might be cheaper in the long run to buy something like the Shen Hao.
 
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The front tilt movement is designed to be used in conjunction with drop baseboard (achieved by pressing down on the center of the two baseboard struts). If you are using a wide-angle lens, the front standard will be positioned on the rear track at infinity focus, the only way to use the tilt is to mount the camera upside down as you mentioned. If you have a ball and socket head and use the side tripod bush on the camera (underneath the handle), the camera will not be at all unstable. Lenses such as 127 and 135 mm focal lengths were designed for press use, they were made with peculiar smaller-than-usual apertures (like f4.7) to fit into smaller shutters and they cover 4x5" exactly at infinity and no more. You can still use tilt with these lenses, you just have to make sure the lens axis (an imaginary line going through the lens at 90° to the lens board) passes through the center of the picture. It may seem crazy to provide a "useless" movement like upward tilt, but downward tilt (on the lens standard) would only mean the lens was "looking" at the end of the baseboard. Speed/Crown Graphics are not the most versatile of view cameras but you can get more out of one than you might think!

Regards,

David

PS: Just for the record, note the spelling "Scheimpflug".
 

MikeK

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My Baby Graphic to achieve the downward tilt :smile: Works a treat with normal to longer lenses. Picture of my modification is here Dead Link Removed

I am sure his bigger brothers and sister can be modified as well.

- Mike
 

photomc

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Thomas, do not remember where I saw it, but there is a website that shows how to modify the Crown/Speed to tilt forward. Seems like it is just a matter of moveing the struts around..but seems like I do remember some metal work also. I am at work right now, and the home computer has been hijacked (trying to get it cleaned up after work hours), but will try to find and post a link.
 

roteague

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huggyviking said:
I am working with my first ever sheet film camera, and it's a Crown Graphic. Now that I am learning more, I would like to be able to control depth of field a little more, using the schweimpflug principle, where the front lens element is tilted forward.

Steve Simmons book on Large Format Photography has a pretty good section on this subject, as does Jack Dykinga's book "Large Format Nature Photography" - although he describes a rear tilt in the book, a movement that I use a lot myself.
 
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