Darkroom Music

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arigram

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Maybe this kind of topic has been discussed before.
It's light, entertaining and easy to contribute to it.
In any case, I'll give it a go, as I have a theory to offer. ;-)

Even though I spend most of my time in silence, when I am involved
in a creative process, it is often that I like to have a soundtrack to go with it.
Everyone knows that a musical device is essential in any serious
darkroom. To my opinion though, the music that is played is not
just a matter of personal taste but also importand to the process.
And also it is different in the two darkroom processes: film developing and
print making.
During film developing I choose songs, not just any music, but songs. That is,
music with lyrics that I can follow during the long and mechanical process. And so, the lyrics have to be known so I can sing along. The music style must have rythm and be somewhat upbeat. I find that greek rebetika, american blues, classic rock and such work well, even though the instrummental solos can harden things a bit.
Now, with print making, the music can be softer, more instrummental and even moody and trippy. Then is when jazz works, argetinian tango, classical musics such as of Europe, India, Japan also fit well, but there has to be a balance in the mood. Opera is too theatrical, that is following a story with mood changes and so can be a bit unpredictable during a session.
The balance has to be between overly loud and dramatic to somber and spacy. So it is not usual to use cretan music (the two extremes), fado, middle eastern and so on.

What do you play?
 

Fintan

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I've an iPod connected to some speakers stuffed with just about everything which I like to play loud, mostly rock, punk, techno, folk etc.
 

JD Morgan

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Sep 23, 2004
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Any sort of marshall stuff from Sousa. I find it increases contrast without filters and makes the tones much more bold and brazen. You must only use a phonograph in there y'know, CDs can infect and corrupt the the other equipment with a mutinous spirit and seriously jeopardize the tranquil harmony of the analog matrix. :wink:
 

eheldreth

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I have an ipod also, I find my moods move between two sets of music. What I like to call dark and moody(bush, garbage, nirvana, the sundays ...) and classic rock/blues(the grateful dead, bob dylan, b.b. king ...). I have noticed when I'm printing I tend to listen to the dead a lot.
 

Max

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I've considered finding tunes and pieces of the appropriate lengths and making a mix for the processes - shortish tune for pre-soak, long one for dev, etc... :wink:
 

titrisol

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I have only a radio, so depending on my mood classical, hard rock or sports radio :wink:
 

Les McLean

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Mostly jazz and rock both instrumental and vocal. When developing film it's usually hard loud rock from Led Zeplin, faster and louder when I want to increase the contrast, I agitate the tank to the beat of the music, and one or two of the less agressive tracks when I want less contrast? Scientific stuff this film developing lark.
 
Joined
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Canada
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My music choice is determined by mood...

Locally, the best radio station I've EVER heard is WDET (Detroit Public Radio). It has one of the best music mixes... For a full day in the dark, it's a good thing to have around. A little news, a great mix of music etc. (They stream online if you're ever interested in giving it a listen but aren't in the Detroit area)

When I'm in the darkroom only for a short while I have a 5 CD changer that I load with a different set of cds depending on how I'm feeling.

Lately I've had my Radiohead CDs in.

joe :smile:

p.s. Funny this topic came up... I was just thinking about this yesterday.
 
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God, i bet you must be printing some really depressing pictures at the moment.

Actually no...

Radiohead doesn't depress me, it gets me thinking, analyzing...

joe :smile:
(notice the smiling face... not depressed, despite the Radiohead :wink: )
 

Monophoto

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Saratoga Spr
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arigram said:
Maybe this kind of topic has been discussed before.
It's light, entertaining and easy to contribute to it.
In any case, I'll give it a go, as I have a theory to offer. ;-)

Even though I spend most of my time in silence, when I am involved
in a creative process, it is often that I like to have a soundtrack to go with it.
Everyone knows that a musical device is essential in any serious
darkroom. To my opinion though, the music that is played is not
just a matter of personal taste but also importand to the process.
And also it is different in the two darkroom processes: film developing and
print making.
During film developing I choose songs, not just any music, but songs. That is,
music with lyrics that I can follow during the long and mechanical process. And so, the lyrics have to be known so I can sing along. The music style must have rythm and be somewhat upbeat. I find that greek rebetika, american blues, classic rock and such work well, even though the instrummental solos can harden things a bit.
Now, with print making, the music can be softer, more instrummental and even moody and trippy. Then is when jazz works, argetinian tango, classical musics such as of Europe, India, Japan also fit well, but there has to be a balance in the mood. Opera is too theatrical, that is following a story with mood changes and so can be a bit unpredictable during a session.
The balance has to be between overly loud and dramatic to somber and spacy. So it is not usual to use cretan music (the two extremes), fado, middle eastern and so on.

What do you play?


Classical.
 

fred

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Sep 8, 2002
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Belgium
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Bruce Springsteen
Bob Seger
Neil Young
Jackson Brown

sometimes the 1st piano concerto of Tsaikofski
sometimes Gregorian (?) Music

and many others

The darkroom, a 'reflection' (?) room??

fred
 

VoidoidRamone

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Aug 5, 2004
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New York Cit
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Frank Zappa = great stuff. He has so much talent that he can play humorous music and it's still better than most, and when he is really shredding it's amazing. Then pretty much any 70s rock... and of course I like the Ramones in any situation. So yeah, Frank Zappa and the Ramones- that's all you need. -Grant
 

Cheryl Jacobs

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Denver, Colo
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I tend to match the mood of the music with the mood of the print I'm working on. I don't do it consciously, but only just realized I was doing it the other day. For my more intense and meaningful prints (not the "cute kid" stuff) I tend to listen to classical piano, with the rumbling lows and soaring highs. Josh Groban and the like are excellent for that, too. Rachmanninoff and Chopin are equally effective. For softer, more understated prints I spin Dido, Norah Jones, John Mayer, something along those lines. When I just need to crank some stuff out -- e.g. prints I've done before and don't have to feel and interpret -- I usually put on something with a good beat, something a bit more kick-ass. Sheryl Crow, Dave Mathews, and (should I admit this?) Avril LaVigne all work well.

Funny thing I noticed the other day: when I'm printing and listening to Josh Groban, all the Italian / Spanish / French lyrics that I often don't understand roll off my tongue with amazing fluidity. I think I'm just much more focused when printing than at any other time, and my brain is sort of uninhibited. Kind of makes you wonder would we'd all be capable of if our brainpower could be completely unleashed, eh?
 

roteague

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Jul 15, 2004
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Kaneohe, Haw
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arigram said:
What do you play?

Generally, Classical or Hawaiian (especially Israel Kamakawiwo'ole and Keali'i Reichel).
 

Shesh

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Joined
Nov 27, 2002
Messages
161
Location
Massachusett
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As some others have mentioned, its totally dictated by mood: The range is from Indian classical (Hindustani and Carnatic), Western classical (Baroque mostly), hard rock and heavy metal. Blues are prohibited from my darkroom since the air guitar makes its appearance a few minutes into the session. :D
 

inthedark

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Joined
May 4, 2003
Messages
336
When I am working in my darkroom I have anywhere from 2 to 5 pumps runnning, so music is a no go. :sad:
 

127

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Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
580
Location
uk
Shooter
127 Format
Anyone tried one of the Apple AirTunes systems in the darkroom?

If you haven't seen them they're a tiny box which you plug into the mains, and attatch speakers to. You can then stream music to them from your computer, over a wireless network. It avoids taking CD players or other equipment into the darkroom - expensive electronics (with flashing lights, and buttons to fumble over!) don't really want to be mixed with chemicals.

I finally caved in and ordered one earlier this week...

Ian
 

shinn

Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2004
Messages
85
Location
Bezerkeley,
Mostly live hippie type music from the Dead to Dave Mathews and especially Wide Spread Panic, but I gotta have some Jazz once in awhile.

Happy days
Mark
 

Robert L

Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2004
Messages
14
Location
Near San Die
Shooter
4x5 Format
Usually it depends on my mood. A nod to Zappa; wish I had my old records. Classical, opera, jazz, and all kinds of rock are in my CD collection. There is also a good Mexican station that comes in with some great folk rock, though I don't speak Spanish.

I have made the mistake of having my stereo (which has a backlit display) on while loading my film tank. It dawned on me that while handling the film and loading the film holders, I could see what I was doing. DOOHHH!
 

Konical

Subscriber
Joined
Jun 1, 2003
Messages
1,820
Good Afternoon,

Classical only, car, darkroom, anywhere. In about an hour, however, no music, no darkroom. Its TV time because the Cardinals are about to play game 6 of the NLCS; fingers are crossed!

Konical
 

geraldatwork

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Joined
Feb 26, 2004
Messages
413
Location
Hicksville,
Shooter
35mm RF
Either classical ,I favor the Baroque era, or folk music from my hippie days. On the rare occasion raggae.
 
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