Cross processing development time?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by EASmithV, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. EASmithV

    EASmithV Member

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    Ok, well I took a roll of Velvia 100, and overexposed most frames on the roll by one or two stops. My question is, if I develop it in C41 chemistry, do I give it the normal C41 development time (3:30), or do I give it more or less time? Does it matter?
     
  2. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If you over exposed it a good guess would be to under develop it by as many stops. I've had good luck pulling some slide film by 2 stops. Colour cross over and grain becomes more pronounced, but the negs can be more printable (all colour fidelity issues aside). E6 materials rated at box speed and developed normally in c41 chems can produce highlights that will completely block light, overexpose it by one or two stops and the mid and highlights will stop bullets -- be unprintable and unscannable.

    There is a myth out there that advises overexposing slides when crossprocessing. The reality is found by to testing each film under the conditions that you shoot. Bracket in 1/3s one stop over and under then dev in c41 at the 'normal' time and temp. From there you'll have a good idea of how to rate the film. A slight or even extreme pull (as noted above) can be helpful or interesting, but you should first establish a baseline.
     
  3. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Shoot. Try it and let us know!

    The color is going to be jacked up anyhow, so you might as well mess around and see what happens. Go ahead and try an extreme pull...perhaps 2:30?

    When cross processing this way, you are shooting for a neg, so will be able to burn through the dense areas when printing, unlike with a positive. Overexposing will lower the over all contrast and open up your shadows, which is why some people like to do it with cross processing. Shadows tend to go pitch black with normal exposure. Personally, I like it, and it is one of the main reasons I have done cross processing, but overexposing is a good trick if you want a *more* "normal" look in the shadows.

    Each film reacts differently, too. My favorite is Provia 100F, but everything works.
     
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  4. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Max density on a crossprocessed neg is not easily burned through, if at all. Overexposed and the neg can quickly become unprintable. Slides are built with a Dmax that is intended to block light this doesn't change when you develop as a neg. I do agree that developing it normally will be informative and that it would be cool if you posted the results.
     
  5. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Dense areas of a cross processed neg can be burned through, and I have never encountered an unprintable density on anything I have ever done overexposed. Everything can be burned through. The important thing is not the exact density, but the difference between highlight density and shadow density. Overexposing reduces this density spread, thus lowers contrast. Will it take a long time to print? Sure. But not forever.
     
  6. jd callow

    jd callow Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    MY experience with xprossed negs differs form yours both in the flattening of the neg and the ability to successfully print through the dmax. The neg stops building density (blocks up) from mids through to the highlights as the exposure increases. You may be able to burn through it in time, but the usefulness of this is questionable. In my opinion exposure of a xprossed neg is as critical or more so than the exposure of a properly developed tranie and overexposure of both is counter productive. The OP can do as he likes, but my recommendation is to pull the processing at 1 stop and to test the film in the future prior to guessing at the proper EI.