CART HELP PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Ultra Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by gerryyaum, Mar 2, 2016.

  1. gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    Hopefully I am not asking anyone here to repeat themselves, could not find anything online so am asking for "ULF Camera Gear Cart Help".

    I have finally entered the world of ULF cameras and photography. I received my Chamonix 16x20 camera from Shanghai yesterday. I will acquire everything else that is required (lots!) in the next few months and start shooting in the summer. My question is this:

    Can anyone out their in APUG land help me with figuring out the best cart system to carry everything? Either something that can be built or something that can be adapted? Golf carts, baby strollers? something else that will work? Designs for a self built cart? I am off to Thailand again in 3 weeks and might be able to get something built there, if I had an idea what the heck to tell the builder! I want something big enough to carry the 16x20, tripod, holders and other goodies. I was thinking of something that I could push might be better than pulling with bigger all terrain wheels (I shoot in places that have rough basic roads). If all of that is not complicated enough I would like something that I can fold up reasonably small to take on Asian buses!

    To much to ask? Impossible? Any and all suggestions would be so helpful. Thanks all. Gerry

    For fun you might enjoy this video, me yesterday doing a very hyper and happy UNBOXING of the Chamonix 16x20 that I have since named (yes named!) MAY LEE.

     
  2. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,445
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    hi gerry
    i am building something like a dense, corrugated cardboard yukka pack for my camera
    not sure if is something you can deal with but it will be simple, and cost effective.
    otherwise i have a big bin everything is in.

    congratulations on your new camera, have fun feeding the beast!
    john
     
  3. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    28,060
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
  4. RobC

    RobC Member

    Messages:
    3,906
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  5. Jim Noel

    Jim Noel Member

    Messages:
    2,275
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I use a collapsible wagon with large pivoting wheels to carry my 7x17 and 8x10 plus accessories.
     
  6. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    7,398
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Location:
    Aurora, Il
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    A three wheeled baby jogger would work. Three decent sized tires, aluminum and typically with a fabric seat.
    If you need larger than a single, there are setups that seat two children side by side. That would most
    likely work out better for you.
    When you start talking about wooden carts weight builds up really quickly.
    Bamboo could be a lightweight alternative though.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    Been looking to find one of these for years, not sure which would work best. If I get a case to carry the gear in everything might weigh in at 100lbs, too much for most baby carriages I think.

    Thanks for your suggestion
     
  8. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    Thanks...its lots of fun
     
  9. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
  10. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    hmm..saw one at Costco last week but not big enough for my needs, would work great with the 8x10 thou!

    Thanks Gerry
     
  11. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
  12. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    Thinking...Adox, Ilford, Kodak films, thinking X-ray film, thinking Direct Positive paper (still learning what that is), thinking Wet Plate...

    She (MAY LEE) will get plenty of food, will take good care of her!

    Thanks Gerry
     
  13. OP
    OP
    gerryyaum

    gerryyaum Member

    Messages:
    475
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Med. Format Pan
    After doing lots of google, found these yesterday, all possibles. The bottom 2 pics are dock carts (??) and collapsible. The top wagon can carry your house (800lbs) not sure how you fold it up and put in your car thou.

    Anyway thought these might be of interest to others.

    http://gerryyaum.blogspot.ca/2016/03/possible-carts.html
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. RobC

    RobC Member

    Messages:
    3,906
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just can't imagine bouncing a camera and lenses across some rough ground on a trolley.

    didn't anyone ever tell you that if it's more than 10 paces from the road it's not worth photographing.
     
  16. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

    Messages:
    1,992
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2013
    Location:
    rAdelaide
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    May or may not be suitable, but I saw a guy here who pours his own wet-plates in-situ, for that he converted an old mobile ice-cream trolley. Like this: http://turnkeyparlor.com/wp-content/uploads/ice-cream-push-carts.jpg
    It had light-tight gloves in the side to do all the pouring in the ex-freezer-compartment. That got added onto with a space to put the tripod and camera, so it all just wheeled around nicely. Not sure how portable it would be offroad though.
    Just did some image searching and instead came up with these, sort of a half-bicycle thing: http://www.indiamart.com/jasvir-industries/ice-cream-trolley.html

    Actually, that's what would be perfect, a Bakfiets (I don't know the english name, that's what they are in dutch, basically means 'bucket bike').
    Like these: http://bakfiets.nl/eng/modellen/ and these: Dead Link Removed (I'd suggest the Trike models, bit sturdier with a huge load offroad)
     
  17. juan

    juan Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,942
    Joined:
    May 7, 2003
    Location:
    St. Simons I
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I tried several kinds of carts and settled on a jogging baby stroller. A black C-1, Zone Vi heavy duty tripod, a dozen film holders and misc. stuff pushed 100 pounds with no trouble. The stroller has locks for the wheels, keeping it from running away. It provides a place to put stuff off the ground, and it is maneuverable.
    You may find some easy modifications helpful.
    Juan
     
  18. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    23,721
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Dock carts are what boaters use to move stuff from their vehicle, down the ramps, along the float and to the side or end of their boat.

    They tend to be left exposed to the elements, which often involve salt air, so they are fairly rugged.

    Being for boaters, they also tend to be expensive.
     
  19. OptiKen

    OptiKen Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,036
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2013
    Location:
    Orange County
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Fill the tires with helium on the motorized one.
    The other one is probably already full of gas.
     
  20. RobC

    RobC Member

    Messages:
    3,906
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2007
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  21. juan

    juan Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,942
    Joined:
    May 7, 2003
    Location:
    St. Simons I
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Someone on the largeformat forum years ago used llamas.
    juan
     
  22. Tis Himself

    Tis Himself Member

    Messages:
    57
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Location:
    So Calif
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I don't shoot LF, but I wonder if the type of cart that letter carriers use could be adapted? They're collapsible and can carry quite a bit of weight. Just a thought.
     
  23. rmann

    rmann Subscriber

    Messages:
    680
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Check this one out, solid bottom rated for 100 pounds, baby stroller or bike trailer - I have one and it works very well on rough ground. http://www.nordiccab.com/product/

    Can be adapted wth a lot of accessories - folds into a very small size - base is molded plastic, not fabric, so it keeps a constant ground clearance.

    They are no longer imported to USA, but I think they might still be sold in Canada. I got mine from a dealer in Canada.
     
  24. scheimfluger_77

    scheimfluger_77 Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    644
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Location:
    mid-Missouri
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
  25. Soeren

    Soeren Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    2,671
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2004
    Location:
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No advise or the like just a con gratulation with your new toy. That thing makes my 45F1 look like a pocket camera :D looks awesome
     
  26. jeffreythree

    jeffreythree Member

    Messages:
    309
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2015
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    First off, nice camera. A possible option to look at is a range cart that shooting competitors use. I have seen 2 and 3 wheeled versions. A cheap welding cart could also be good with a bit of modification.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. If you have a Photrio account, please log in (and select 'stay logged in') to prevent recurrence of this notice.