C41 Kit Instructions vs Standard

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Born2Late

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Here is my situation: I haven’t processed C41 or E6 for many years. Previously I just used Kodak kits (the very good old days), but obviously I don’t have that option anymore. Eventually I will probably purchase the Kodak components or Fuji kits, I want separate fixer and bleach. To get started back again I purchase a Unicolor C41 kit because it was cheap and I didn’t want to mess with the shipping issues associated with the liquid kits just yet. I also assemble a temperature controlled water bath that works quite nicely.

So here is my dilemma; the Unicolor instruction state a different development temperature and time, 102 degrees F and 3:30 respectively from the standard. The standard for C41 is 100 degrees and 3:15. So, which should I use? Is the Unicolor chemistry different or are they trying to compensate for temperature drift down (something I won’t face with the water bath)?

I would appreciate any input / advice.

Thanks
 
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If you use 101 deg and 3:22.5 you will be fine. Using either time or temp will produce results for you. How critical is your application? If for a paying client, find Kodak Flexicolor chemistry and use the prescribed process. If there is flexibility in your results, go with either set of parameters you listed, or an average of the two.
 

thuggins

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If I remember correctly when reading about the Unicolor kit (I think it was Unicolor), it seemed apparent they intended the temperature to "drift thru" 100 degrees. i.e. They assume you are not going to be using a water bath to maintain a constant temperature.
 

Helios 1984

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If I may suggest, dump the hexamine stabilizer included in the Unicolor kit and purchase a bottle of Kodak C-41 Final Rinse.
 

Helios 1984

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I am curious as to why?

It can leave horrible deposits, even if you mix it with a dash of wetting agent and distilled water. With Kodak C-41 Final Rinse, your negatives will dry nicely.
 
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Born2Late

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It can leave horrible deposits, even if you mix it with a dash of wetting agent and distilled water. With Kodak C-41 Final Rinse, your negatives will dry nicely.
I am wondering if you would lose the stabilization protection if you rinsed with a bath of rinse agent (in water) afterward.
 

Photo Engineer

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Use the Kodak Final Rinse. See my sticky about the stabilizer / final rinse question.

As for any C41 kit, there was once a published report on this showing how much difference there was between various kits available out there. Only Kodak and Fuji appear to make kits that meet a general standard that matches all C41 films.

PE
 
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Born2Late

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Use the Kodak Final Rinse. See my sticky about the stabilizer / final rinse question.

As for any C41 kit, there was once a published report on this showing how much difference there was between various kits available out there. Only Kodak and Fuji appear to make kits that meet a general standard that matches all C41 films.

PE
Thanks PE,

Being the Dean of color chemistry here (and thank goodness we have your experience to draw upon); if you were in my shoes, would you follow the directions in this case, or would you use the standard. Also, I need to develop a couple of my rolls this weekend; could I skip the stabilizer and rinse the film with the Kodak stabilizer in a week when I can get it?

Going forward I expect that I'll either be using Kodak components or Fuji kits to avoid such concerns. I've managed to latch on to a couple of rolls of the new Ektachrome. After I evaluate it I'll decide if I will be processing slides or print film, not both; if slides it looks like Fuji is the only practical route at present.

Thanks again for your advice.
 

Helios 1984

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If you get dried deposits, you could re-wash with plain distilled water, scan the negatives & use the hexamine stabilizer after you're done.
That's what I did when I unsuccessfully tried to get rid of the dried deposits by re-washing & re-stabilizing 5 times...
Kodak C-41 Final Rinse, a cheap & wonderful investment.
 
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