btzs tube developing

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by mitch brown, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. mitch brown

    mitch brown Subscriber

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    i was watching the fred newman video and after seeing it i have a question .
    he lodes the film in the dark developes it and then openes them in the light placeing them in the stop bath , then pulls the film out put on hanges in full room light then fixes them. doesn't this go against eveything you hear or read about developing film? doesn't the film fog?
    thanks
     
  2. trexx

    trexx Member

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    Yes it goes against what you have learned. No it does not tend to fog film. I will not say it could not fog but it has never been a problem for me. See the thread herel

    Others will cry 'don't do this!', but I have found safe and effective. Just do not be lackadaisical about moving from opening the tube to the stop. BTW this is one of the few times I use an acid stop as normal workflow.
     
  3. Martin Aislabie

    Martin Aislabie Subscriber

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    I understand (please feel free to correct me if I am wrong) that by the end of the development process, film is pretty insensitive to light as the light sensitive silver halides have all been converted into something else by the developer

    My only experience of this was to find a sheet of film floating in developer when I switched the darkroom lights on when I thought (mistakenly) everything was safely in the fixer bath.

    “Oh bother” I said – or something like it

    I just grabbed it and shoved it straight into the Fixer missing out the Stop completely.

    I didn’t bother to note which negative it was, I was too keen on making sure it was fully immersed in the fix.

    Now I have printed the batch of Negs, I am reasonably certain of which it is, but not because of any apparent increase in Base Fog but because it is slightly more contrasty compared to the others in that batch.

    It surprised me; I thought I would have ruined the Neg but seemingly not.

    BTW – I wouldn’t recommend normally collecting Negs out of the Developer under normal light – it does your heart rate no good at all – but it is fascinating to see just how fast the film turns milky and then clears in Fixer – about 30secs or so and it was clear – I thought it would be far longer

    Personally, I have never used the BTZS Tubes - but I thought you were recommended to do the Stop & Fixing under a dim Safelight?

    Martin
     
  4. George Collier

    George Collier Member

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    I remember reading in a darkroom magazine, when I first learned of these tubes and the article stated that you could dump the developer and "float" them in a tray of water or stop (depending on the fixer type) in room light. My interpretation was that the amount of light falling on the film inclosed in the tube before ending developer action was insignificant, but what Martin says makes sense to me too.