baseboard problem

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by David Lyga, Jan 28, 2018.

  1. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    I have an old Bogen enlarger with a pressed wood chip baseboard that is starting to flake badly. I was thinking of wrapping it carefully in duct tape strips so that it would remain intact. There used to be sold sticky cupboard plastic sheeting that is sticky on one side only, but that was when we had 5 and dime stores way back. Any suggestions? - David Lyga
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Hotmelt formica liners are available at DIY stores. At least over here. You get them in over-width on the roll, fix them by hot ironing them to the edges and then cut-off the surplus width.
    Otherwise you could seal the chipping edges by painting them. But a liner would yield the smoothest surface.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  3. tedr1

    tedr1 Member

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    One of those plastic films was called Fablon. Another, more rigid material, was called Formica.

    If you have a saw and a drill, inexpensive pieces of 3/4in MDF board can be bought in 1x1ft and 2x2ft sizes at DIY stores Homedepot and Lowes, they may even be willing to cut a piece to size for you. This would make a new baseboard that will last (another) lifetime.
     
  4. voceumana

    voceumana Member

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    Or just replace the entire baseboard. I was able to get a Saunders/LPL 670 for free but missing the baseboard and power supply. I bought the following for the baseboard: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0049FOQ0W/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    The board is very substantial, about 1 inch thick, very nicely made. Just drill a hole/holes to mount your column. It is 2 ft. square so it might be larger than your Bogen's baseboard.
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    The rectangular versions (24" x 30" or 24" x 42") might be even more useful.
    Now of course you may prefer the appearance of Duct tape ....
     
  6. darkroommike

    darkroommike Subscriber

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    I went to a store that fabricates plastic laminate kitchen counter tops and got a cut out for a stove insert, I actually was given about ten for free since the foreman didn't have anymore room in the dumpster, you could just drill holes and transfer all the hardware from your current baseboard to a new one.
     
  7. mfagan

    mfagan Subscriber

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    It seems that a benefit of replacing with a new flat surface instead of repairing (which might not be flat) might be more consistent alignment when moving the easel onto different areas of the baseboard.
     
  8. M Carter

    M Carter Member

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    When I had a 67C Beseler, I dumped the baseboard and mounted the enlarger on sort of a plywood box - got it up high enough to do 16x20. I cut a large sheet of melamine board and used some 3/8" threaded set screws as "feet" so I could level it, and it sat on the worktable, worked really quite well.
     
  9. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    Much depends on the cause, if it's from excessive exposure to moisture, replacing with one made from plywood is probably the best solution.
    However, especially if it's coming apart just from age, and tthe flaking isn't extensive, you could likely stabilize the bad area with some thin cyanoacrylate glue (aka "Super glue"), but you don't want the thickened stuff sold as "Super Glue", so get it from the sort of hobby store that sells model airplanes and such.
    Brushing on some thinned shellac might be another possibility, it would need several coats.
     
  10. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    OR remove the baseboard and have someone make one for you.
     
  11. Jim Jones

    Jim Jones Subscriber

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    3/4" plywood may be less prone to warping than MDF.
     
  12. Truzi

    Truzi Member

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    Considering where you live, I imagine people discard decent furniture, counter tops, shelving, etc. not infrequently. Unless you are intent on keeping the original base, a frugal option would be to find a discarded shelf, end table top, etc. and re-purpose it. You could even use it to smack those pesky cyclists as you walk home :wink:
     
  13. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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    Make a new baseboard or have someone else do it for you. Messing with this one will likely take just as much time and money, and still not leave you with a reliable baseboard long term.

    I just repaired an old contact printing frame (which had sentimental value or else I would have just replaced it) that had a particle board bottom. I wanted to keep it as original as possible, but I knew the degrading particle board would be more work and less reliable than a plywood replacement. So rather than repair it now and repair it again in a few years, I made a new bottom and stained it to match. Not only does it work better, but it looks nicer.
     
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  15. CMoore

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    I would follow the lead of these two posts.....if it were me. :smile:
     
  16. mpirie

    mpirie Member

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    ....or ignore the baseboard and fabricate a wall mount?
     
  17. tedr1

    tedr1 Member

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    My experience with both these materials is otherwise. By the way MDF means to me the material made of very fine sawdust and resin, quite different from "chipboard" made from much larger particles and weaker. The reason I prefer MDF is because it is a homogenous material that has little internal stress and is ground flat and square. Whereas plywood is a laminate of natural timber veneers which retain stresses from processing and drying and are often not flat and square, or, if they begin life so do not stay that way. Both materials are vulnerable to moisture, MDF more so than plywood, in humid conditions both perform best with the addition of a protective sealing layer such as laquer or varnish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2018
  18. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I assume the baseboard of my Agfa Varioscop is not even made from common plywood, but rod-plywood.
    That is a array of massive wood-rods laminated between plywood covers.
     
  19. paul ron

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    i have a brother in law from brooklyn that covers almost everything in sanitest... a self stick plastic sheeting. but for your situation id make a new baseboard from MDO. home depot carries it. another material is melamene. its a finished plastic coated particle board... also available from home depot.

    MDO holds screws better and is waterproof.

    MDO.... link
    http://theplywood.com/mdo-hdo

    MDF.... Medium density fiber board.... not the same as MDO...
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
  20. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I never heard of MDO or HDO. But designations are different over here. MDF is even a rather new term here.

    Melamine is actually the term used for cover layers that have got a melamine resin as binder. Another term is Formica.
     
  21. paul ron

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    formica is a brand name thin laminent that gets glued to plywood.
    http://www.formica.com/en/us/products/formica-laminate-home#swatchesTab
    its only 1/16" thick.

    melamene is a paper finished coating on flake board. generally, its a cheap flake board solution that looks great but not for long term use, it will swell if it gets wet, breaks easily and doesnt hold screws well. ikea uses alot of this stuff with special peg in hole lock joints.





     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
  22. mshchem

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    David, I remember "Contact Paper Woodgrain Material" it was cheap in the good old days, now it would probably cost an arm and a leg. Elmer's Glue All white glue is a good wood glue. The duct tape idea makes sense to me. It's fast and cheap. If you can find a friend that is good with cutting wood panels that would be ideal.
    I've noticed that a lot of great printers and photographers make great pictures with home made equipment.
    Best Regards, Mike
     
  23. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    I truly believe that David has been quieter on this thread than any other he has started here.
    He must be having trouble getting to the Library:D.
    Hope the thread has been helpful David, and that you are okay.
     
  24. OP
    OP
    David Lyga

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    OK folks, I was remiss. I was busy with other matters ... but now I am here to thank all (and I really mean it). Not wanting to spend much money for a rather trivial matter, I think that I will employ half a roll of duct tape, carefully applied. But I did remember when five and dime stores abounded, each store had a section where 'one side sticky' shelving material was always available. I guess nowadays people simply buy new stuff rather than fix the old. Another alternative is a new baseboard. That is not as hard as it seems, as I do have a drill and could easily put holes in the proper place.

    But, what is especially revealing to me is this: Bogen was a very solid name back in the 60s and 70s. To make a baseboard out of this pressed material is rather troubling to me. I currently use a Meopta Axomat 5, made in a former Communist country (Czechoslovakia) and its baseboard is made of the best wood I ever saw or felt. The enlarger's build quality is superb and I have been using it since the late 80s. But I wanted to make the Bogen fully intact so that was the reason for my query. The formica approach would not really be suitable, as the flaking is coming primarily from the sides. Duct tape will completely seal this malady.

    One finds out a lot of information with posting items such as this. The practicality of working with wood seems to be a craft well worth the effort. I wished to expend neither the time nor money in doing this 'right', so I think that what I have proposed will work out fine, with the future possibility of changing the actual baseboard. Again, thank you all for your collective input. - David Lyga
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  25. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    Duct tape will hide the problem, but not really do anything towards resolving it, IMHO, FWIW.

    As for press board for an enlarger base, it's not really a terrible material choice, it's heavy, which is good, and resistant to vibration, which is also good. Bogan made some fine products, but, as I recall, their enlargers were oriented to the amateur market, and getting to an attractive price point was (is) important for that market. So a material that is inexpensive, but has good functional attributes would be important.
     
  26. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Hotmelt edge liner costs over here less than 5€ per 5m roll.
     
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