Arista Ortho Arista APHS

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Aggie

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You can develop the film with safe lights, and using dektol. This allows you to develop by inspection. I've done everything from 1:1 to traces of residual dektol in the trays, with excellent results. For more contrast in the negatives, do not dilute as much. 1:4 would be very good.
 

dancqu

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Nick Zentena said:
Not very high IIRC. 3 or 6? Good if
you don't have a shutter.

I'd suggest a film developer for film; some one
that would be used with Tech. Pan.

A speed of 3 or 6. Is'nt that about the speed of
print paper. Ortho. You don't suppose they coat
that film with the same emulsion they use on
VC papers? Or perhaps vice versa? Dan
 

fschifano

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Certainly not VC paper, but it seems that it could be something close to a graded paper but sensitive to a broader range of wavelengths. Note that you shouldn't use an OC safelight when developing this film. A red safelight is recommended.
 

Will S

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Does this film need a hardening fixer? I asked in another thread but no one ever replied. I have some Kodak rapid fix but I've never used it. It looks like mix 1:2 and then add the hardener, but I'm thinking that you can leave the hardener out and just mix it with water and do it separate from the fix. But I'm not sure how much water to add to it. Maybe 100:1?

Thanks,

Will
 

Nick Zentena

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Will S said:
Does this film need a hardening fixer? I asked in another thread but no one ever replied. I have some Kodak rapid fix but I've never used it. It looks like mix 1:2 and then add the hardener, but I'm thinking that you can leave the hardener out and just mix it with water and do it separate from the fix. But I'm not sure how much water to add to it. Maybe 100:1?

Thanks,

Will

I don't know what Kodak uses for a hardner but it may need an acid enviroment. That's one reason for many fixers being acidic so the hardener can work. In other words I doubt you could just put it in water.
 

fschifano

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Everything I've read indicates that you need an acid environment for hardeners to work. If there's something out there that works in a neutral to alkaline environment, I don't know about it. So yes, I would expect the hardener to be of little value if it were just mixed with water. On another note, I've rarely seen the need for a hardening fixer. As long as you are careful when handling the film after fixation, you should be fine. Once the film is dry, the hardener no longer has any effect.
 
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