21/4 X 31/4 film developing

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by RPippin, Mar 1, 2009.

  1. RPippin

    RPippin Subscriber

    Messages:
    287
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2008
    Location:
    Staunton VA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Could use some advice on developing 21/4X31/4 sheet film. Outside of tray developing what are my options. I would like to do stand developing but can't figure out how to keep the negatives submerged completely in a tray.
     
  2. Bob-D659

    Bob-D659 Member

    Messages:
    1,300
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Winnipeg, Ca
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yankee Adjustable Cut Film Tank from www.porters.com info from a similar question on photo.net
     
  3. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,256
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've used the Yankee tank for much of my 23 sheet film, but my results have not been as consistent as I would like. I sometimes get effects at the edges sort of like bromide drag, and I sometimes get some unexplainable spots. I'm not always sure if the problems are the tank or the film, which has usually been EFKE PL-100M when I've had problems. But the tank does work. I prefer the Jobo tank and machine, and it seems to work better. I haven't tried the Combiplan tank, but it is also a possibility.
     
  4. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    18,458
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Tanks and hangers, if you can find the hangers, are one option. Another is the Nikor sheet film tank, which can be adjusted from 4x5" to 2x3", if you can find one at a price you're willing to pay.
     
  5. fschifano

    fschifano Member

    Messages:
    3,216
    Joined:
    May 12, 2003
    Location:
    Valley Strea
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    First of all, stand development can often be unpredictable, and more often than not will leave you uneven development. Call it what you will; bromide drag, streaking, or spotting are all just different ways of describing uneven development.

    I have not used the Yankee tank, but I haven't read too many good things about it. I use the CombiPlan tank myself, and it's pretty good all things considered. It is a little slow to fill and drain, but not so bad that it causes uneven development as long as you stick with relatively slow working developers. I try to aim for development times around 10 minutes or so with this tank. This way, the fill and drain times are a small fraction of the total development time and have no noticeable effect on the final product.

    The Jobo tank and reel seems to be a good solution as well. It can be used as a standard inversion tank without the processor, but it still works out to be considerably more expensive than the CombiPlan even without the base. It also has a relatively small capacity, and that pretty much eliminates being able to use slow working, dilute developers.
     
  6. gordrob

    gordrob Subscriber

    Messages:
    456
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2005
    Location:
    Western Cana
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I use hangers in a 4x5 hard rubber tank. Alternative is a Nikor 4x5 adjustable sheet film tank. Both have given me good results.
    Gord
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    19,453
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Back in the UK I have a Climax developing tank, it takes glass plates or cut film 2¼ x 3¼, it's a wonderful small tank & very useable. HoweverI'd really give another vote for a Yankee, I use one for 9x12's.

    Ian
     
  8. doughowk

    doughowk Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,775
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2003
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Fedco Developing Tank on the used market. Yields very consistent results.
     
  9. ricksplace

    ricksplace Member

    Messages:
    1,564
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2006
    Location:
    Thunder Bay,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    MUCH easier solution: Take a plastic reel (the adjustable kind) and find just the right distance to accept the width of the sheet film (slightly smaller than 120), and glue the reel at that location. You won't have the ratchet feed of roll film, but the sheets can easily be fed through the spiral. I find I can get about 6 to eight sheets on one reel. Then put the reel in a tank and pretend you have 120 roll film in there.
     
  10. kenkuro

    kenkuro Member

    Messages:
    13
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    Location:
    Victoria, Ca
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    A stainless steel developing tank for a single 35mm reel without a reel. Put a film's short end in the bottom corner emulsion side up, other end rest at the rim. Put the cover. Develop as if it were a 35mm film (shake or flip as you fancy). You can only do one sheet at a time. Do not put the film emulsion side down, you will get uneven development.
     
  11. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

    Messages:
    2,384
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    Boston area
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Nikor made a small SS rack that fit into a regular stainless tank and allowed you to put in 6 or 8 sheets. I have one that I inherited from a relative. I didn't know what it was until I measured it. It looks like two pieces of corrugated metal connected at each side and at one end by thin struts. Works great. I also have an "Adjustable Developing Tank for cut film and film packs" (Model DT-500) made by the fR company, good for anything from "vest pocket cut film" through 4x5. Easily adjustable and quick to fill, it works better (for me anyway) than the Yankee version. It was a PHSNE Auction dollar-table purchase and another reason I keep going back to that event. Last year I picked up two Uni-Color tanks and a agitator for a total of $3. Keep looking- these things are out there.
     
  12. ChuckP

    ChuckP Subscriber

    Messages:
    704
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Location:
    NW Chicagola
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Maybe you could build one of those tray slosher inserts sized for 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 film. You could use it for stand development in your trays. Plans for 4x5 size should be available someplace.
     
  13. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,256
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Los Alamos,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The design of the slosher is such that a regular 4X5 slosher would probably work without modification. It would certainly be worth a try. Of course, the slosher is really a method of tray developing for clumsy people like me.
     
  14. fschifano

    fschifano Member

    Messages:
    3,216
    Joined:
    May 12, 2003
    Location:
    Valley Strea
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The slosher that ChuckP mentioned reminded me of this home made gadget. Looks great for tray development. Though designed for 4x5, it can be easily modified for the size you need.

    http://philbard.com/panel.html
     
  15. eclarke

    eclarke Member

    Messages:
    1,970
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2004
    Location:
    New Berlin,
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Tanks and hangers but I have also modified a Jobo 120 reel by welding it in a fixed position, it works well for 2 sheets...Evan Clarke